Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a programming exercise that has interested me for some time. The goal of this exercise is to generate a softball schedule for a seasons programatically. What I am looking for is general advice rather than a specific anwser as I am trying to learn something in the process.

The part of the program I am really struggling with is how to generate all of the games that are played in one night. This is the basic functionality I am trying to achieve in the first interation.

Problem: Given a list of teams, generate a schedule that has every team play 2 games, and no team can play the same team twice in one night.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I went with the implementation that I found on Wikipedia for Round Robin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round-robin%5Ftournament

The standard algorithm for round-robins is to assign each competitor a number, and pair them off in the first round …

  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  
  14 13 12 11 10 9  8

… then fix one competitor (number one in this example) and rotate the others clockwise …

 1  14 2  3  4  5  6
 13 12 11 10 9  8  7


 1  13 14 2  3  4  5
 12 11 10 9  8  7  6

… until you end up almost back at the initial position

 1  3  4  5  6  7  8
 2 14  13 12 11 10 9
share|improve this answer
    
I'd love to see the algorithm in code for this... –  ganders Sep 11 '13 at 17:19
add comment

It seems like you could do this quite simply by just rotating your team list.

e.g. given teams 1..10, do this:

Team A: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
Team B: 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10  1

so in game one, team A plays team B. For game two, rotate again:

Team A: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
Team B: 3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10  1  2

Nine games will give you a full round-robin, and then you can start at the beginning again. Take the games in pairs for your nightly matchups.

EDIT

Kylotan points out that this doesn't actually work, as it has every team playing twice at once. Oops. If you came up with something that genuinely works, I encourage you to post it and accept it :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I knew there had to be a simple and elegant solution to this problem. this overcomes the first of several challenges. –  Aaron M Aug 3 '09 at 15:07
    
I implemented this solution and it works. The only issue I have it that it looks too computer generated, but that is something I can live with –  Aaron M Aug 4 '09 at 12:05
2  
Doesn't that system have team 2 playing against team 1 and team 3 for game one? –  Kylotan Aug 4 '09 at 14:58
    
Damn, I had a feeling the problem was harder than that :-/ Funny how you can't see your own mistakes. –  John Fouhy Aug 4 '09 at 22:43
    
This solution works if you split the teams in half. –  Aaron M Nov 16 '09 at 20:33
add comment

Use this kind of circulation. You keep the teams in a ring and rotate the ring around.

Team A:  1 2 3
Team B:  4 5 6

Team A:  4 1 2
Team B:  5 6 3

Team A:  5 4 1 
Team B:  6 3 2

Team A:  6 5 4
Team B:  3 2 1

Team A:  3 6 5
Team B:  2 1 4
share|improve this answer
add comment

The following solution might not be the best, but see if it works for you.

I start by creating a structure to hold each Game

public struct Game {
   private int TeamA;
   private int TeamB;
   private bool GamePlayed;

   // I am adding this to quickly see what team is playing. I used this for debugging
   // purposes to make sure the same team doesn't play another team twice.
   public override ToString() {
      return TeamA.ToString() + " vs. " + TeamB.ToString(); 
   }
}

Then I create a List that comtains all the different combinations of 10 teams playing each other. There should be 45.

List<Game> AllGamesInSchedule = new List<Game>();

for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
    for (int j = (i + 1); j <= 10; j++) {
        AllGamesInSchedule.Add(new Game(i, j));
    }
}

// This prints all the different game combinations out to the console to see
// that they are all different.
foreach (Game game in AllGamesInSchedule) {
    Console.WriteLine(game.ToString());
}

Now you can create a method that picks games out of this List. Once a game is picked out, change the GamePlayed field to true to know that you shouldn't pick this match again. Or you could just remove the game from the list.

You said you wanted guidance and that is why I didn't create the method to pick games out.

Hopes this helps.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.