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When writing a generic method to process data for a form, I came across with the following (as I see it) unexpedted behavior. Given the following code:

public class Test {
   public <T> void someGenericMethod(Integer a) {
      @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
      T t = (T) a;
      System.out.println(t);
      System.out.println(t.getClass());
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Test test = new Test();
      test.<BigDecimal>someGenericMethod(42);
   }  
}

AFAIK, the code above should generate a ClassCastException in the line T t = (T) a because the method call in main is setting the parametrized type to BigDecimal and casting from Integer to BigDecimal is not allowed, conversely to what I expected, the program executed well and printed the following:

42
class java.lang.Integer 

In fact, if I add another parameter to the method signature (like String b) and make another assigment T t2 = (T) b, the program prints

42
class java.lang.String 

Why the t variable changed it's type to Integer (is, by any chance, making some kind of promotion on the type T to Object)?

Any explanation on this behavior is welcome

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(T) a is an unchecked cast: due to type erasure, the runtime has no way of knowing what type T is, so it can't actually check if a belongs to type T.

The compiler issues a warning when you do this; in your case, you've suppressed that warning by writing @SuppressWarnings("unchecked").


Edited to add (in response to a further question in the comments below):

If you want to check the cast, you can write this:

public class Test {
   public <T> void someGenericMethod(Class<T> clazz, Integer a) {
      T t = clazz.cast(a);
      System.out.println(t);
      System.out.println(t.getClass());
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Test test = new Test();
      // gives a ClassCastException at runtime:
      test.someGenericMethod(BigDecimal.class, 42);
   }
}

by passing in clazz, you allow the runtime to check the cast; and, what's more, you allow the compiler to infer T from the method arguments, so you don't have to write test.<BigDecimal>someGenericMethod anymore.

Of course, the code that calls the method can still circumvent this by using an unchecked cast:

public static void main(String[] args) {
   Test test = new Test();
   Class clazz = Object.class;
   test.someGenericMethod((Class<BigDecimal>) clazz, 42);
}

but then that's main's fault, not someGenericMethod's. :-)

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Yes, is an unchecked cast, but why is not throwing a ClassCastException instead of changing the type of T to Object? –  higuaro Aug 30 '12 at 21:06
1  
Because it's an unchecked cast. The runtime can't check the validity of the cast. If the runtime could check the cast, it would see that it's invalid, and throw a ClassCastException; but it can't, so it doesn't, and doesn't. I'm not sure why you expect otherwise. –  ruakh Aug 30 '12 at 21:11
    
Pretty much the definition of an unchecked cast is that it can't check if a ClassCastException would be thrown if the full type information were known at runtime. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 31 '12 at 0:19
    
Thanks for the clarification, didn't know unchecked cast implies that much –  higuaro Aug 31 '12 at 1:03
    
So, the <BigDecimal> thing in the test.<BigDecimal>someGenericMethod invocation is pretty useless if the method signature does not contains at least one T parameter? –  higuaro Aug 31 '12 at 1:09

When compiling, your code above basically becomes the following non-generic method:

public void someGenericMethod(Integer a) {
   Object t = a;
   System.out.println(t);
   System.out.println(t.getClass());
}

There is no cast. No exception.

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Thanks, so the <BigDecimal> is useless if you don't add a parameter of type T in the method signature... –  higuaro Aug 31 '12 at 0:46

You specify a type parameter in your method signature, but never use it.

I think you want something like this:

public class Test {
   public <T> void someGenericMethod(T someItem) {
      System.out.println(someItem);
      System.out.println(someItem.getClass());
   }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test test = new Test();
    BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(42);

    test.someGenericMethod(42);    // Integer
    test.someGenericMethod("42");  // String
    test.someGenericMethod(42L);   // Long
    test.someGenericMethod(bd);    // BigDecimal
}  

Note that there's no need to cast.

The parameter type is declared in the method signature and inferred from the parameter.

In your code you're parameterizing the method call (which I've never seen) and passing in an int.

It's kinda hard to understand what you're trying to do, since your example code does nothing.

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