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This is the skeleton code:

public abstract class Processor {
  private static HashSet<Processor> processors;
  abstract protected void process(Bean bean);

  public static void main() {
    // initialization
    processors = new HashSet<Processor>();
    processors.add(new FooProcessor());
    processors.add(new BarProcessor());

    // and query
    ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery("...");

    while (rs.next()) {
      Bean bean = makeBean(rs);
      for (Process proc : processors) {
        proc.process(bean);
      }
    }
  }
}

public FooProcessor extends Processor {
  @override
  public void process(Bean bean) {
    // do something
  }
}

public BarProcessor extends Processor {
  @override
  public void process(Bean bean) {
    // do something
  }
}

Basically, I need several independent processors to process the same dataset selected from a database. The processors are similar in nature. They all need to implement the process() method. I can write other child processors if needed.

I don't know much about design patterns. Is this design OK? Thanks!

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closed as off topic by Jesse Webb, Antony Scott, andrewsi, Bryan Crosby, maček Aug 31 '12 at 16:33

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This question would be more appropriate on programmers.stackexchange.com –  Jesse Webb Aug 30 '12 at 21:31
2  
Does it do what you need it to? (I thought that said FoodProcessor at first; shows where my mind is at.) –  Dave Newton Aug 30 '12 at 21:32
    
Oh. Bad choice of name ;) –  sean hawk Aug 30 '12 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If it were me I'd have an interface for your Processor and have all the specific processors you need implement that interface. Then just iterate over the list of IProcessors. Though if there is common functionality they all share then you are correct in your inheritance based design...though I might consider an abstract base class.

The implementation would look something like this.

public interface IProcessor {
     public void process(Bean bean);
}


public FooProcessor implements IProcessor {
     void process(Bean bean){
          // Process data
     }
}

public BarProcessor implements IProcessor {
     void process(Bean bean){
          // Process data
     }
}

And then in you main() you can do this:

public static void main() {
     List<IProcessor> processors = new List<IProcessor>();
     processors.add(new FooProcessor());
     processors.add(new BarProcessor());

     Bean bean = // some data;

     for(IProcessor processor : processors){
          processor.process(bean);
     }

}

Abstract classes are great if you have common code to share but if you don't I would avoid using them since you can only extend one class but you can implement many interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
In the code, Processor is an abstract class. Are you suggesting that I shouldn't put the main method in this class? –  sean hawk Aug 30 '12 at 21:37
    
@seanhawk yes, Processor should just be an interface. –  oldrinb Aug 30 '12 at 21:55

For simple usage, you can stick with what you have (and could benefit from abstracting few details like others suggested). If you want a small set of library that can handling the basic plumbing for you then it is encouraged to leverage an existing proven library like commons-chain.

I see you are using HashSet and it doesn't guarantee the order of iteration. If ordering is important then I'd suggest a List implementation. From HashSet javadoc

It makes no guarantees as to the iteration order of the set; in particular, it does not guarantee that the order will remain constant over time. This class permits the null element.

This is similar to Chain of Responsibility pattern and you could benefit by leveraging commons-chain library from Apache.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Order is not relevant in my application; that's why I said they are independent. –  sean hawk Aug 30 '12 at 22:03

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