Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to know whether this sentence is correct?

You can do:

var a = new A();

if and only if A is instanceof Function.

Simply you can create an instance of function and you know a function is an object. Why can't we create an instance of other user-defined objects? Like this:

var b={};
var c = new b();  //error

EDIT: How can I change b so that I can create an instance of that?

share|improve this question
    
You mean, if you declare a = {};, for example? –  Andre Aug 30 '12 at 22:54
    
Because instances need to be "constructed" from a constructor -- or a unit of work that is responsible for "creating" an object, in the literal sense of a "constructor" -- hence a function –  32bitkid Aug 30 '12 at 22:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can actually use Object.create() to have some sugar around ECMAscript's prototypal nature. Like

var b = { };
var c = Object.create( b );

Now, c will have b on its prototype chain. ECMAscript or more precisely, prototypal inheritance doesn't work exactly the same way as a "classical inheritance". By calling new when invoking a function, you actually receiving a newly created object aswell. You can modify and access that object via the this value within that such called constructor function.

However, you didn't inherit anything so far. You would need to create and fill the .prototype - object for your constructor function before you create instances of it. This pattern annoyed lots of people, so ES5 brought as a more convinient way to directly inherit from other objects using Object.create().

share|improve this answer

Short answer: The new operator requires its operand to have a special internal method [[Construct]] that generic objects do not have.

Long answer:

11.2.2 The new Operator
The production NewExpression : new NewExpression is evaluated as follows:
    1. Evaluate NewExpression.
    2. Call GetValue(Result(1)).
    3. If Type(Result(2)) is not Object, throw a TypeError exception.
    4. If Result(2) does not implement the internal [[Construct]] method, throw a TypeError exception.
    5. Call the [[Construct]] method on Result(2), providing no arguments (that is, an empty list of arguments).
    6. Return Result(5).

    The production MemberExpression : new MemberExpression Arguments is evaluated as follows:

    1. Evaluate MemberExpression.
    2. Call GetValue(Result(1)).
    3. Evaluate Arguments, producing an internal list of argument values (11.2.4).
    4. If Type(Result(2)) is not Object, throw a TypeError exception.
    5. If Result(2) does not implement the internal [[Construct]] method, throw a TypeError exception.
    6. Call the [[Construct]] method on Result(2), providing the list Result(3) as the argument values.
    7. Return Result(6).
share|improve this answer
    
How can I change b so that I can create an instance of that? –  Dariush Jafari Aug 30 '12 at 23:16
    
What are you /really/ trying to do? Why are you trying to create such a beast? –  Jeremy J Starcher Aug 31 '12 at 0:16

Simply you can create an instance of function and you know a function is an object. Why can't we create an instance of other user-defined objects?

It’s not quite correct to say “you can create an instance of function”. The new keyword is a bit misleading - it makes JavaScript look like it implements object-orientation using classes, when in fact it doesn’t.

What you’re actually doing with new A() is creating an object using the constructor function A. The new keyword tells the JavaScript interpreter to return an object from A - specifically the object referred to as this inside of A.

EDIT: How can I change b so that I can create an instance of that?

In your example, b is an object (var b={};). If you change b into a constructor function, then you can create objects using it. (By convention, constructor functions in JavaScript start with capital letters.)

So:

function B () {
}

var c = new B();

You can add things to the prototype object of B, and they’ll be accessible on c too (and on any other objects you create using B):

function B () {
}

B.prototype.NAME = 'B';

B.prototype.hello = function () {
    alert('Hello!');
}

var c = new B();
c.NAME // 'B'
c.hello() // alerts 'Hello!'
share|improve this answer

You can also do

var b = new a.constructor();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.