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I read a few lines from STDIN. How can I pass the remaining of STDIN to a command that reads from standard input (e.g. md5sum or wc)?

I could do a:

read_a_few_lines_from_diamond_operator();
open (C, "|cmd");
while(<>) { print C }
close C;
cleanup_after_C();

but for efficency reasons I would like not to touch the input, but instead pass the filehandle of STDIN. Sort of like:

seq 10 | (read A; wc)

where read reads as much as it likes before passing the rest on to wc. I cannot use this solution, though, as I need to start the command from inside my perl program and I need to do work after cmd completes.


I read a few lines from the file 'foo'. How can I pass the remaining to a command that reads from standard input (e.g. md5sum or wc)?

I could do a:

open (F, "<foo");
read_a_few_lines_from_F();
open (C, "|cmd");
while(<F>) { print C }
close C;
cleanup_after_C();

but for efficency reasons I would like not to touch the input, but instead pass the rest of file 'foo'.


I have a feeling it can to be done using trickery like select, open(FOO,">&STDOUT), exec 6<&0, fork, pipe.

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The answer is quite simple: You don't need to do anything special. Your child will automatically inherit your STDIN with system and exec. Everything you haven't read from STDIN will be readable by the child.

There is a problem, though. Because reading one character at a time would be crazy inefficient, Perl reads from the file a block at a time. That is to say you read more from the file than the "few lines" you got back from Perl. This can clearly be seen using the following command:

perl -E'say $_ x 500 for "a".."z"' \
   | perl -e'<>; <>; exec("cat");' \
   | less

Instead of starting at the start of the second line, cat starts in the middle of the "q"s (at byte 8192)!

You'd have to switch from reading lines with readline (<>) to reading individual bytes with sysread if you wanted this to work.


Focusing on the bigger picture, I think there is a solution:

open(STDIN, "<", "foo") or die $!;
read_a_few_lines(*STDIN);
my $pos = tell(STDIN);
open(STDIN, "<", "foo") or die $!;
sysseek(STDIN, $pos, SEEK_SET);
system(@cmd);
...

Or maybe even:

open(STDIN, "<", "foo") or die $!;
read_a_few_lines(*STDIN);
sysseek(STDIN, tell(STDIN), SEEK_SET);
system(@cmd);
...

Untested.

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Elegant solution which earns you a thumbs up, but it has 2 problems: It kills off perl (I have clarified the question to make it clear that this will not work for me); and it does not deal with the 2nd part (reading the file 'foo'). –  Ole Tange Aug 31 '12 at 7:17
    
Why doesn't it work? Like the answer says, it works for system as well as exec. Does perl -e 'print <>; system("cat"); print "still here\n"' <file not represent the bare-bones case of your scenario? –  tripleee Aug 31 '12 at 7:29
    
Well spotted. This works: seq 10 | perl -e 'sysread(STDIN,$a,1); print "$a bar";system("cat"); print "still here\n"'. It still leaves reading the file 'foo', though. –  Ole Tange Aug 31 '12 at 13:03
    
@Ole Tange, Missed that bit since I didn't think you'd want the silly solution of using sysread. Just use open(STDIN, '<', 'foo') or die $!; Or if you don't want to clobber the parent's STDIN, open(local *CHILD_STDIN, '<', 'foo') or die $!; waitpid(open3('<&CHILD_STDIN', '>&STDOUT', '>&STDERR', @cmd), 0); –  ikegami Aug 31 '12 at 14:47
    
@Ole Tange, I think I have a solution. See update. –  ikegami Aug 31 '12 at 14:52
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