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I have a lot of variables in which I want to make sure they do not equal a certain value.

if($post[0] !== "-" && $post[3] !== "-" && $post[8] !== "-" ...) {
    // code to be executed
}

A function seems to be the smartest solution, something on the lines of:

function check_var($junk_value, $array) {
    foreach($array as $arr) {
        if($arr[$key]) == $junk_value) {
            return false;
        }
        else {
            return true;
        }
    }
}
$junk_value = "-";
$array = array($post[0], $post[3], $post[8], $hello);
check_var($junk_value, $array);

I'm not very good with foreach loops and I don't know how everyone else uses "$key" but it's outputting that it was not set for me. I've always wondering how people used the "$key" and "$value" variables without ever defining them.

EDIT: I soaked up so much information on this question. In 10 minutes, I feel like I know so much more. Thank you to all the answers.

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Your loop will only ever test the first $key. Get rid of your else clause and move your return true outside of the foreach or just remove it entirely, since an ending function returns true by default. –  ghoti Aug 31 '12 at 5:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
if (!in_array('-', $post)) {
  // code to be executed
}

And your code should be

function check_var($junk_value, $array) {
  foreach($array as $val) {
    if ($val == $junk_value) {
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
ahhh this logic. always something easier and always a better way to do thing. I'm going to use your answer, but do you know why my function doesn't work? –  user1631995 Aug 31 '12 at 5:00

To answer your question of

I've always wondering how people used the "$key" and "$value" variables without ever defining them

You reference the key in the foreach declaration:

foreach($array as $key => $value) {
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, that answers my question. does the $key have a special meaning in a foreach loop? –  user1631995 Aug 31 '12 at 5:01
    
Yes so if you have an array like array('foo'=>'bar', 'baz'=>'bat'), the $key would be foo and baz. In your example of a $_POST array, the $key would be the input field name. If you omit associative keys, like array('foo', 'bar'), the $keys would be 0 and 1, respectively. –  AlienWebguy Aug 31 '12 at 5:02
    
thank you, that clears things up. and it was meant to be $post :) –  user1631995 Aug 31 '12 at 5:04

when using

foreach($array as $arr)

here $arr is the value and not the key so you need to check

 if($arr == $junk_value)

In case you also want key then use

foreach($array as $key=>$value)

but then again using foreach you are having both value and key so no need of using $arr[$key]

share|improve this answer
    
That is just what I was looking for. thank you –  user1631995 Aug 31 '12 at 5:02

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