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Using stack trace can give only the class not the instance of the caller. So I wondered if there is a solution using ContextBoundObject since problem is about context.

But ContextBoundObject seems very complex to understand I cannot understand how to use it so does someone knows if it is possible ?

Update: I'm not interested about AOP here just in getting the reference to the object instance that calls a method. AOP is different from my question so I don't think article with AOP does answer my question but I have the "intuition" that ContextBoundObject could be an answer but I'm not sure so my question :)

Can you imagine in real world if you couldn't know who is calling you by phone :) A programming language should expose the caller instance because it can be needed for some use cases.

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Can you explain in more detail what you are trying to achieve and what have you tried till now? –  Amit Mittal Aug 31 '12 at 5:31
    
You might want to un-tag AOP then, eh :) –  Blorgbeard Aug 31 '12 at 5:34
    
@Amit Mittal, let's say I want to logging caller instance properties or call back some method on it. –  user310291 Aug 31 '12 at 6:49
    
If it's really needed, you can always pass the instance as a parameter? –  Blorgbeard Sep 2 '12 at 22:49

1 Answer 1

In general, it is impossible because of method inlining and garbage collection.

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Why? How .NET runtime can do itself to execute a method on an instance if he wouldn't have any reference to that instance ? How could he intercept method call without reference to that object instance ? If .Net runtime can have this reference why couldn't it make available (and if context is not valid just throw some exceptions) ? –  user310291 Aug 31 '12 at 8:41
    
Can you imagine in real world if you couldn't know who is calling you by phone :) A programming language should expose the caller instance because it can be needed for some use cases. –  user310291 Aug 31 '12 at 8:46

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