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I'm making a practice program to make a simple alteration to a variable in my Makefile while learning C. I get a segfault whenever I run this program, but I don't know why. I suspect it has something to do with the "r+" fopen mode or my use of fseek(). Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void rewind(FILE *f)
{   
    long start = 0;
    fseek(f, start, SEEK_SET);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if(argc != 2)
    {
        printf("arguments too many or too few. use: setfile <filename> (minus .c extension)\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    FILE *mfile = fopen("Makefile", "r+"); // note to self: r+ is for a file that already exists
    FILE *old_mfile = fopen("OLD.Makefile", "r+");  // w+ erases the file and starts in read-write mode with a fresh one
    char line[200];
    char *fn_ptr;
    char *name = argv[1];

    while(fgets(line, 199, mfile)) // first create the backup
    {   
        fputs(line , old_mfile); // before changing the line, write it to the backup
    }
    rewind(mfile); // reset the files to position 0
    rewind(old_mfile);
    puts("Makefile backed-up as 'OLD.Makefile'");

    while(fgets(line, 199, old_mfile)) // now lets loop again and rewrite with the new FNAME
    {
        if((fn_ptr = (strstr(line, "FNAME= "))))
        {
            fn_ptr += strlen("FNAME= ");
            int i;
            for(i = 0; i < strlen(name); i++)
            {
                *(fn_ptr+i) = *(name+i);
            }
            *(fn_ptr+i) = '\0';

        }
        // printf("%s", line); // for debugging
        fputs(line , mfile);
    }
    printf("FNAME is now: '%s'\n", argv[1]);
    fclose(mfile);
    fclose(old_mfile);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
Are you sure "Makefile" exists? You aren't doing any error checking on the return of fopen not being NULL... – ctrahey Aug 31 '12 at 5:26
3  
Also, why redefine rewind? It's standard C90 – ctrahey Aug 31 '12 at 5:28
4  
FIrst of all, I'd suggest you building you program with -g flag and run it under gdb. After fail, call bt in your gdb session and see the line where it fails. I think, after that you'd be able to answer your question for yourself. – Dmitriy Ugnichenko Aug 31 '12 at 5:29
2  
Always compile your program with gcc -Wall -Wextra -g and improve them till no warnings are given – Basile Starynkevitch Aug 31 '12 at 5:36
    
The first thing you should do when you get e.g. a segmentation fault, is to run your program in a debugger. This will help you locate the line of the error, and let you see how the callstack looks like. It will also let you examine variables to see what might have caused the problem. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 31 '12 at 5:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a working version. There are several subtle points to note here so I will leave you to examine them one by one by toggling the changes in and out. The man pages for the called functions are probably enough if carefully read.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void rewind(FILE *f)
{
    long start = 0;
    fseek(f, start, SEEK_SET);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    if(argc != 2)
    {
        printf("arguments too many or too few. use: setfile <filename> (minus .c extension)\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    FILE *mfile = fopen("Makefile", "r+"); // note to self: r+ is for a file that already exists
    FILE *old_mfile = fopen("OLD.Makefile", "w+");  // w+ erases the file and starts in read-write mode with a fresh one
    char line[200];
    char *fn_ptr;
    char *name = argv[1];

    while(fgets(line, 199, mfile)) // first create the backup
    {
        fputs(line , old_mfile); // before changing the line, write it to the backup
        memset(line,0x00,200);
    }
    rewind(mfile); // reset the files to position 0
    rewind(old_mfile);
    memset(line,0x00,200);
    puts("Makefile backed-up as 'OLD.Makefile'");

    fclose(mfile);
    mfile = fopen("Makefile", "w");
    while(fgets(line, 199, old_mfile)) // now lets loop again and rewrite with the new FNAME
    {
        if((fn_ptr = strstr(line, "FNAME=")) != NULL)
        {
            fn_ptr += strlen("FNAME=");
            int i;
            for(i = 0; i < strlen(name); i++)
            {
                *(fn_ptr+i) = *(name+i);
            }
            *(fn_ptr+i) = '\0';

        }
        // printf("%s", line); // for debugging
        fputs(line , mfile);
        fputs("\n" , mfile);
        memset(line,0x00,200);
    }
    printf("FNAME is now: '%s'\n", argv[1]);
    fclose(mfile);
    fclose(old_mfile);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Running the program in gdb is a very good idea as previously mentioned. For file test.c,. call gcc +g test.c -o test, and then call gdb test to get a debug session, enter set args newname, and then use break, run, continue commands. – Alec Danyshchuk Aug 31 '12 at 9:57

Check this line again:

FILE *old_mfile = fopen("OLD.Makefile", "r+");  // w+ erases the file and starts in read-write mode with a fresh one

You have the correct mode in the comment, but not in the fopen call.

How to not get the segmentation fault, besides changing the mode? Always check return values! If fopen fails it will return NULL.

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