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What is the most efficient way to clone a JavaScript object? I've seen obj = eval(uneval(o)); being used, but that's non-standard and only supported by Firefox. I've done things like obj = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(o)); but question the efficiency. I've also seen recursive copying functions with various flaws.

I'm surprised no canonical solution exists.

share|improve this question
85  
eval() is evil. Even if targeting a browser where eval(uneval(o)); works I would definitely avoid that technique. – buley Nov 5 '11 at 18:44
407  
Eval is not evil. Using eval poorly is. If you are afraid of its side effects you are using it wrong. The side effects you fear are the reasons to use it. Did any one by the way actually answer your question? – Prospero Mar 22 '12 at 14:08
6  
Cloning objects is a tricky business, especially with custom objects of arbitrary collections. Which probably why there is no out-of-the box way to do it. – b01 Mar 11 '13 at 22:25
26  
Wow, a lot of answers for something really simple. If you can use ES5 (IE9+) then do var obj2 = Object.create(obj1); if not, then use the answer from @protonfish. jsFiddle: jsfiddle.net/dotnetCarpenter/yufzc1jt – dotnetCarpenter Oct 22 '14 at 18:17
6  
@dotnetCarpenter your solution would work only with simple objects, but the prototype object is the same, and the new object is using the original references, so if you have inner objects in your original object your solution fails: jsfiddle.net/rahpuser/yufzc1jt/2 – rahpuser Nov 25 '14 at 21:46

42 Answers 42

up vote 3321 down vote accepted

Note: This is a reply to another answer, not a proper response to this question. If you wish to have fast object cloning please follow Corban's advice in their answer to this question.


I want to note that the .clone() method in jQuery only clones DOM elements. In order to clone JavaScript objects, you would do:

// Shallow copy
var newObject = jQuery.extend({}, oldObject);

// Deep copy
var newObject = jQuery.extend(true, {}, oldObject);

More information can be found in the jQuery documentation.

I also want to note that the deep copy is actually much smarter than what is shown above – it's able to avoid many traps (trying to deep extend a DOM element, for example). It's used frequently in jQuery core and in plugins to great effect.

share|improve this answer
24  
For those who didn't realize, John Resig's answer was probably intended as a kind of response/clarification to ConroyP's answer, instead of a direct reply to the question. – S. Kirby Sep 2 '12 at 20:11
6  
@ThiefMaster github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/master/src/core.js at line 276 (there's a bit of code that does something else but the code for "how to do this in JS" is there :) – Rune FS Mar 27 '13 at 8:16
4  
Here's the JS code behind the jQuery deep copy, for anyone interested: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/master/src/core.js#L265-327 – Alex W Apr 11 '13 at 14:24
96  
Woah! Just to be super-clear: no idea why this response was picked as the right answer, this was a reply to responses given below: stackoverflow.com/a/122190/6524 (which was recommending .clone(), which is not the right code to be using in this context). Unfortunately this question has gone through so many revisions the original discussion is no longer even apparent! Please just follow Corban's advice and write a loop or copy the properties directly over to a new object, if you care about speed. Or test it out for yourself! – John Resig Jan 21 '14 at 3:37
7  
How would one do this without using jQuery? – Awesomeness01 Apr 30 '15 at 2:22

Checkout this benchmark: http://jsperf.com/cloning-an-object/2

In my previous tests where speed was a main concern I found JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) to be the fastest way to deep clone an object (it beats out jQuery.extend with deep flag set true by 10-20%).

jQuery.extend is pretty fast when the deep flag is set to false (shallow clone). It is a good option, because it includes some extra logic for type validation and doesn't copy over undefined properties, etc., but this will also slow you down a little.

If you know the structure of the objects you are trying to clone or can avoid deep nested arrays you can write a simple for (var i in obj) loop to clone your object while checking hasOwnProperty and it will be much much faster than jQuery.

Lastly if you are attempting to clone a known object structure in a hot loop you can get MUCH MUCH MORE PERFORMANCE by simply in-lining the clone procedure and manually constructing the object.

JavaScript trace engines suck at optimizing for..in loops and checking hasOwnProperty will slow you down as well. Manual clone when speed is an absolute must.

var clonedObject = {
  knownProp: obj.knownProp,
  ..
}

I hope you found this helpful.

share|improve this answer
149  
Beware using the JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) method on Date objects - JSON.stringify(new Date()) returns a string representation of the date in ISO format, which JSON.parse() doesn't convert back to a Date object. See this answer for more details. – Alex Aug 14 '14 at 11:47
2  
@trysis Object.create is not cloning the object, is using the prototype object... jsfiddle.net/rahpuser/yufzc1jt/2 – rahpuser Nov 25 '14 at 21:37
8  
This method will also remove the keys from your object, which have functions as their values, because the JSON doesn't support functions. – Karlen Kishmiryan May 29 '15 at 9:52
1  
Also keep in mind that using JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)) on Date Objects will also convert the date back to UTC in the string representation in the ISO8601 format. – dnlgmzddr Jul 30 '15 at 21:37
1  
JSON approach also chokes on circular references. – rich remer Feb 13 at 5:25

Assuming that you have only variables and not any functions in your object, you can just use:

var newObject = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(oldObject));
share|improve this answer
59  
the con of this approach as I've just found is if your object has any functions (mine has internal getters & setters) then these are lost when stringified.. If that's all you need this method is fine.. – Markive Jan 17 '13 at 11:00
23  
@Jason, The reason why this method is slower than shallow copying (on a deep object) is that this method, by definition, deep copies. But since JSON is implemented in native code (in most browsers), this will be considerably faster than using any other javascript-based deep copying solution, and may sometimes be faster than a javascript-based shallow copying technique (see: jsperf.com/cloning-an-object/79). – MiJyn Jul 4 '13 at 7:42
19  
JSON.stringify({key: undefined}) //=> "{}" – Web_Designer Apr 30 '14 at 6:24
11  
this technique is going to destroy also all Date objects that are stored inside the object, converting them to string form. – fstab Aug 21 '14 at 12:51
3  
It will fail to copy anything that is not part of the JSON spec (json.org) – cdmckay Feb 9 at 15:07

If there wasn't any builtin one, you could try:

    function clone(obj) {
      if (obj === null || typeof(obj) !== 'object' || 'isActiveClone' in obj)
        return obj;

      if (obj instanceof Date)
        var temp = new obj.constructor(); //or new Date(obj);
      else
        var temp = obj.constructor();

      for (var key in obj) {
        if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) {
          obj['isActiveClone'] = null;
          temp[key] = clone(obj[key]);
          delete obj['isActiveClone'];
        }
      }

      return temp;
    }

share|improve this answer
14  
The JQuery solution will work for DOM elements but not just any Object. Mootools has the same limit. Wish they had a generic "clone" for just any object... The recursive solution should work for anything. It's probably the way to go. – jschrab Sep 23 '08 at 17:23
5  
This function breaks if the object being cloned has a constructor that requires parameters. It seems like we can change it to "var temp = new Object()" and have it work in every case, no? – Andrew Arnott Oct 4 '09 at 22:06
3  
Andrew, if you change it to var temp = new Object(), then your clone won't have the same prototype as the original object. Try using: 'var newProto = function(){}; newProto.prototype = obj.constructor; var temp = new newProto();' – limscoder Sep 14 '11 at 15:53
1  
Similar to limscoder's answer, see my answer below on how to do this without calling the constructor: stackoverflow.com/a/13333781/560114 – Matt Browne Nov 11 '12 at 17:55
1  
For objects that contain references to sub-parts (i.e., networks of objects), this does not work: If two references point to the same sub-object, the copy contains two different copies of it. And if there are recursive references, the function will never terminate (well, at least not in the way you want it :-) For these general cases, you have to add a dictionary of objects already copied, and check whether you already copied it... Programming is complex when you use a simple language – virtualnobi Nov 11 '13 at 8:34
up vote 160 down vote
+50

Structured Clones

HTML5 defines a method for creating deep clones of objects. It only works for certain built-in types, but is considerably more flexible than using JSON. The internal structured cloning algorithm also supports an increasing number of types including Dates, RegExps, Maps, Sets, Blobs, FileLists, ImageDatas, sparse Arrays, and Typed Arrays, and supports cyclical/recursive structures.

Asynchronous Cloning

There's no public API specifically for creating structured clones, but posting messages through MessageChannels is a pretty direct approach for asynchronous cloning. Here's one possible ES6 structuredClone(obj) function returning a Promise with a structured clone of obj.

class StructuredCloner {
  constructor() {
    this.pendingClones_ = new Map();
    this.nextKey_ = 0;

    const channel = new MessageChannel();
    this.inPort_ = channel.port1;
    this.outPort_ = channel.port2;

    this.outPort_.onmessage = ({data: {key, value}}) => {
      const resolve = this.pendingClones_.get(key);
      resolve(value);
      this.pendingClones_.delete(key);
    };
    this.outPort_.start();
  }

  clone(value) {
    return new Promise(resolve => {
      const key = this.nextKey_++;
      this.pendingClones_.set(key, resolve);
      this.inPort_.postMessage({key, value});
    });
  }
}

const structuredClone = window.structuredClone =
    StructuredCloner.prototype.clone.bind(new StructuredCloner);

Example Use:

'use strict';

const main = () => {
  const original = { date: new Date(), number: Math.random() };
  original.self = original;

  structuredClone(original).then(clone => {
    // They're different objects:
    console.assert(original !== clone);
    console.assert(original.date !== clone.date);

    // They're cyclical:
    console.assert(original.self === original);
    console.assert(clone.self === clone);

    // They contain equivalent values:
    console.assert(original.number === clone.number);
    console.assert(Number(original.date) === Number(clone.date));
  
    console.log("Assertions complete.");
  });
};

class StructuredCloner {
  constructor() {
    this.pendingClones_ = new Map();
    this.nextKey_ = 0;

    const channel = new MessageChannel();
    this.inPort_ = channel.port1;
    this.outPort_ = channel.port2;

    this.outPort_.onmessage = ({data: {key, value}}) => {
      const resolve = this.pendingClones_.get(key);
      resolve(value);
      this.pendingClones_.delete(key);
    };
    this.outPort_.start();
  }

  clone(value) {
    return new Promise(resolve => {
      const key = this.nextKey_++;
      this.pendingClones_.set(key, resolve);
      this.inPort_.postMessage({key, value});
    });
  }
}

const structuredClone = window.structuredClone =
      StructuredCloner.prototype.clone.bind(new StructuredCloner);

main();

Impractical Synchronous Cloning

Unfortunately, there are not yet any practical options for creating structured clones synchronously. Here are a couple of hacky impractical options.

history.pushState() and history.replaceState() both create a structured clone of their first argument, and assign that value to history.state. You can use this to create a structured clone of any object like this:

const structuredClone = obj => {
  const oldState = history.state;
  history.replaceState(obj, null);
  const clonedObj = history.state;
  history.replaceState(oldState, null);
  return clonedObj;
};

Example Use:

'use strict';

const main = () => {
  const original = { date: new Date(), number: Math.random() };
  original.self = original;

  const clone = structuredClone(original);
  
  // They're different objects:
  console.assert(original !== clone);
  console.assert(original.date !== clone.date);

  // They're cyclical:
  console.assert(original.self === original);
  console.assert(clone.self === clone);

  // They contain equivalent values:
  console.assert(original.number === clone.number);
  console.assert(Number(original.date) === Number(clone.date));
  
  console.log("Assertions complete.");
};

const structuredClone = obj => {
  const oldState = history.state;
  history.replaceState(obj, null);
  const clonedObj = history.state;
  history.replaceState(oldState, null);
  return clonedObj;
};

main();

Though synchronous, this can be is extremely slow. It incurs all of the overhead associated with manipulating the browser history. Calling this method repeatedly can cause Chrome to become temporarily unresponsive.

The Notification constructor creates a structured clone of its associated data. It also attempts to display a browser notification to the user, but this will silently fail unless you have requested notification permission. In case you have the permission for other purposes, we'll immediately close the notification we've created.

const structuredClone = obj => {
  const n = new Notification('', {data: obj, silent: true});
  n.close();
  return n.data;
};

Example Use:

'use strict';

const main = () => {
  const original = { date: new Date(), number: Math.random() };
  original.self = original;

  const clone = structuredClone(original);
  
  // They're different objects:
  console.assert(original !== clone);
  console.assert(original.date !== clone.date);

  // They're cyclical:
  console.assert(original.self === original);
  console.assert(clone.self === clone);

  // They contain equivalent values:
  console.assert(original.number === clone.number);
  console.assert(Number(original.date) === Number(clone.date));
  
  console.log("Assertions complete.");
};

const structuredClone = obj => {
  const n = new Notification('', {data: obj, silent: true});
  n.close();
  return n.data;
};

main();

share|improve this answer
    
I was pretty sure there was a way to do a synchronous structured clone... not yet? – Ryan O'Hara May 4 '13 at 14:50
2  
@rynah I just looked through the spec again and you're right: the history.pushState() and history.replaceState() methods both synchronously set history.state to a structured clone of their first argument. A little weird, but it works. I'm updating my answer now. – Jeremy Banks May 6 '13 at 3:11
17  
This is just so wrong! That API is not meant to be used this way. – Fardin Jul 31 '14 at 23:34
81  
As the guy who implemented pushState in Firefox, I feel an odd mix of pride and revulsion at this hack. Well done, guys. – Justin L. Aug 14 '14 at 18:37
1  
Your JavaScript is so Java :) – Dmitry Parzhitsky Apr 19 at 7:32

Code:

// extends 'from' object with members from 'to'. If 'to' is null, a deep clone of 'from' is returned
function extend(from, to)
{
    if (from == null || typeof from != "object") return from;
    if (from.constructor != Object && from.constructor != Array) return from;
    if (from.constructor == Date || from.constructor == RegExp || from.constructor == Function ||
        from.constructor == String || from.constructor == Number || from.constructor == Boolean)
        return new from.constructor(from);

    to = to || new from.constructor();

    for (var name in from)
    {
        to[name] = typeof to[name] == "undefined" ? extend(from[name], null) : to[name];
    }

    return to;
}

Test:

var obj =
{
    date: new Date(),
    func: function(q) { return 1 + q; },
    num: 123,
    text: "asdasd",
    array: [1, "asd"],
    regex: new RegExp(/aaa/i),
    subobj:
    {
        num: 234,
        text: "asdsaD"
    }
}

var clone = extend(obj);
share|improve this answer
8  
+1 for taking into account things like Date and RegExp, which neither jQuery nor Underscore do – Justin Warkentin Oct 3 '12 at 16:56
    
+++ Really excelent solution!!!! – jherax Jul 22 '14 at 17:09
1  
what about var obj = {} and obj.a = obj – neaumusic May 5 '15 at 22:40
3  
I don't understand this function. Suppose from.constructor is Date for example. How would the third if test be reached when the 2nd if test would succeed & cause the function to return (since Date != Object && Date != Array)? – Adam McKee Sep 1 '15 at 2:10
    
@AdamMcKee Because javascript argument passing and variable assignment is tricky. This approach works great, including dates (which indeed are handled by the second test) - fiddle to test here: jsfiddle.net/zqv9q9c6. – brichins Jun 14 at 20:39

This is what I'm using:

function cloneObject(obj) {
    var clone = {};
    for(var i in obj) {
        if(typeof(obj[i])=="object" && obj[i] != null)
            clone[i] = cloneObject(obj[i]);
        else
            clone[i] = obj[i];
    }
    return clone;
}
share|improve this answer
8  
This does not seem right. cloneObject({ name: null }) => {"name":{}} – Niyaz Feb 27 '13 at 14:36
8  
This is due to another dumb thing in javascript typeof null > "object" but Object.keys(null) > TypeError: Requested keys of a value that is not an object. change the condition to if(typeof(obj[i])=="object" && obj[i]!=null) – Vitim.us Apr 16 '13 at 16:42
    
This will assign inherited enumerable properties of obj directly to the clone, and assumes that obj is a plain Object. – RobG Feb 1 at 22:58
var clone = function() {
    var newObj = (this instanceof Array) ? [] : {};
    for (var i in this) {
        if (this[i] && typeof this[i] == "object") {
            newObj[i] = this[i].clone();
        }
        else
        {
            newObj[i] = this[i];
        }
    }
    return newObj;
}; 

Object.defineProperty( Object.prototype, "clone", {value: clone, enumerable: false});
share|improve this answer

I know this is an old post, but I thought this may be of some help to the next person who stumbles along.

As long as you don't assign an object to anything it maintains no reference in memory. So to make an object that you want to share among other objects, you'll have to create a factory like so:

var a = function(){
    return {
        father:'zacharias'
    };
},
b = a(),
c = a();
c.father = 'johndoe';
alert(b.father);
share|improve this answer
7  
I like this one! Specially because I wasn't using jQuery. – Tom Roggero Nov 7 '11 at 20:08
10  
This answer is not really relevant because the question is: given instance b how does one create copy c WHILE not knowing about factory a or not wanting to use factory a. The reason one may not want to use the factory is that after instantiation b may have been initialised with additional data (e.g. user input). – Noel Abrahams May 8 '12 at 9:57
7  
It's true that this is not really an answer to the question, but I think it's important that it be here because it is the answer to the question I suspect many of the people coming here are really meaning to ask. – Semicolon Mar 6 '13 at 23:31
1  
+1 for bringing up the factory pattern. While this may not be THE exact answer to the original question, it it adresses the problem domain with a solution that besides all the "out-of-the-box" and "super-performant" cheese suggests a well-defined and readable way. You js folks sometimes seem to forget that good performance is not just a matter of speed and instant hackiness – Lukas Bünger Oct 18 '13 at 0:45
5  
Sorry guys, I don't really understand why so many upvotes. Cloning an object is a pretty clear concept, you cone an object from ANOTHER object, and it doesn't have much to do with creating a new one with the factory pattern. – opensas Aug 18 '14 at 12:51

Deep copy by performance: Ranked from best to worst

  • Reassignment "=" (string arrays, number arrays - only)
  • Slice (string arrays, number arrays - only)
  • Concatenation (string arrays, number arrays - only)
  • Custom function: for-loop or recursive copy
  • jQuery's $.extend
  • JSON.parse (string arrays, number arrays, object arrays - only)
  • Underscore.js's _.clone (string arrays, number arrays - only)
  • Lo-Dash's _.cloneDeep

Deep copy an array of strings or numbers:

When an array contains numbers and strings - functions like .slice(), .concat(), .splice(), the assignment operator "=", and Underscore.js's clone function; will make a deep copy of the array's elements.

Where reassignment has the fastest performance:

var arr1 = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
var arr2 = arr1;
arr1 = ['a', 'b', 'c'];

And .slice() has better performance than .concat(), http://jsperf.com/duplicate-array-slice-vs-concat/3

var arr1 = ['a', 'b', 'c'];  // Becomes arr1 = ['a', 'b', 'c']
var arr2a = arr1.slice(0);   // Becomes arr2a = ['a', 'b', 'c'] - deep copy
var arr2b = arr1.concat();   // Becomes arr2b = ['a', 'b', 'c'] - deep copy

Deep copy an array of objects:

var arr1 = [{object:'a'}, {object:'b'}];

Write a custom function (has faster performance than $.extend() or JSON.parse):

function copy(o) {
   var out, v, key;
   out = Array.isArray(o) ? [] : {};
   for (key in o) {
       v = o[key];
       out[key] = (typeof v === "object") ? copy(v) : v;
   }
   return out;
}

copy(arr1);

Use third-party utility functions:

$.extend(true, [], arr1); // Jquery Extend
JSON.parse(arr1);
_.cloneDeep(arr1); // Lo-dash

Where jQuery's $.extend has better performance:

share|improve this answer
    
Quick fix for native solution. ` Object.assign({}, arr1) ` – Mathdoy Mar 25 at 16:39
    
@Mathdoy - Thanks. Updated. – tfmontague Mar 27 at 0:53
    
I tested a few and _.extend({}, (obj)) was BY FAR the fastest: 20x faster than JSON.parse and 60% faster than Object.assign, for example. It copies all sub-objects quite well. – Nico Durand May 9 at 19:56
    
@NicoDurand - Are your performance tests online? – tfmontague May 17 at 13:36
1  
Object.assign is not deep – Janus Troelsen Jun 6 at 10:02

The efficient way to clone an object in one line of code

An Object.assign method is part of the ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) standard and does exactly what you need.

var clone = Object.assign({}, obj);

The Object.assign() method is used to copy the values of all enumerable own properties from one or more source objects to a target object.

Read more...

The polyfill to support older browsers:

if (!Object.assign) {
  Object.defineProperty(Object, 'assign', {
    enumerable: false,
    configurable: true,
    writable: true,
    value: function(target) {
      'use strict';
      if (target === undefined || target === null) {
        throw new TypeError('Cannot convert first argument to object');
      }

      var to = Object(target);
      for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        var nextSource = arguments[i];
        if (nextSource === undefined || nextSource === null) {
          continue;
        }
        nextSource = Object(nextSource);

        var keysArray = Object.keys(nextSource);
        for (var nextIndex = 0, len = keysArray.length; nextIndex < len; nextIndex++) {
          var nextKey = keysArray[nextIndex];
          var desc = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(nextSource, nextKey);
          if (desc !== undefined && desc.enumerable) {
            to[nextKey] = nextSource[nextKey];
          }
        }
      }
      return to;
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This doesn't recursively copy so doesn't really offer a solution to the problem of cloning an object. – mwhite Mar 8 at 19:56
    
This method worked for my needs, although in an angular app the child elements of the cloned objects are treated as belonging to the original object. :/ Probably because this only clones the first level of properties? Not sure. – ninja08 Apr 27 at 7:27
    
This method worked, although I tested a few and _.extend({}, (obj)) was BY FAR the fastest: 20x faster than JSON.parse and 60% faster than Object.assign, for example. It copies all sub-objects quite well. – Nico Durand May 9 at 19:57
    
@mwhite there is a difference between clone and deep-clone. This answer does in fact clone, but it doesn't deep-clone. – Meirion Hughes Jun 8 at 12:08

If you're using it, the Underscore.js library has a clone method.

var newObject = _.clone(oldObject);
share|improve this answer
13  
lodash has a cloneDeep method, it also support another param to clone to make it deep: lodash.com/docs#clone and lodash.com/docs#cloneDeep – opensas Mar 2 '13 at 17:14
7  
@opensas agreed. Lodash is generally superior to underscore – nha Jul 31 '14 at 12:12
    
I advocate deleting this and all other answers which are just one-line references to a utility library's .clone(...) method. Every major library will have them, and the repeated brief non-detailed answers aren't useful to most visitors, who won't be using that particular library. – Jeremy Banks Apr 7 at 17:25

There’s a library (called “clone”), that does this quite well. It provides the most complete recursive cloning/copying of arbitrary objects that I know of. It also supports circular references, which is not covered by the other answers, yet.

You can find it on npm, too. It can be used for the browser as well as Node.js.

Here is an example on how to use it:

Install it with

npm install clone

or package it with Ender.

ender build clone [...]

You can also download the source code manually.

Then you can use it in your source code.

var clone = require('clone');

var a = { foo: { bar: 'baz' } };  // inital value of a
var b = clone(a);                 // clone a -> b
a.foo.bar = 'foo';                // change a

console.log(a);                   // { foo: { bar: 'foo' } }
console.log(b);                   // { foo: { bar: 'baz' } }

(Disclaimer: I’m the author of the library.)

share|improve this answer
2  
npm clone has been invaluable to me for cloning arbitrarily nested objects. This is the right answer. – Andy Ray Sep 10 '15 at 3:21

Here's a version of ConroyP's answer above that works even if the constructor has required parameters:

//If Object.create isn't already defined, we just do the simple shim,
//without the second argument, since that's all we need here
var object_create = Object.create;
if (typeof object_create !== 'function') {
    object_create = function(o) {
        function F() {}
        F.prototype = o;
        return new F();
    };
}

function deepCopy(obj) {
    if(obj == null || typeof(obj) !== 'object'){
        return obj;
    }
    //make sure the returned object has the same prototype as the original
    var ret = object_create(obj.constructor.prototype);
    for(var key in obj){
        ret[key] = deepCopy(obj[key]);
    }
    return ret;
}

This function is also available in my simpleoo library.

Edit:

Here's a more robust version (thanks to Justin McCandless this now supports cyclic references as well):

/**
 * Deep copy an object (make copies of all its object properties, sub-properties, etc.)
 * An improved version of http://keithdevens.com/weblog/archive/2007/Jun/07/javascript.clone
 * that doesn't break if the constructor has required parameters
 * 
 * It also borrows some code from http://stackoverflow.com/a/11621004/560114
 */ 
function deepCopy(src, /* INTERNAL */ _visited) {
    if(src == null || typeof(src) !== 'object'){
        return src;
    }

    // Initialize the visited objects array if needed
    // This is used to detect cyclic references
    if (_visited == undefined){
        _visited = [];
    }
    // Otherwise, ensure src has not already been visited
    else {
        var i, len = _visited.length;
        for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
            // If src was already visited, don't try to copy it, just return the reference
            if (src === _visited[i]) {
                return src;
            }
        }
    }

    // Add this object to the visited array
    _visited.push(src);

    //Honor native/custom clone methods
    if(typeof src.clone == 'function'){
        return src.clone(true);
    }

    //Special cases:
    //Array
    if (Object.prototype.toString.call(src) == '[object Array]') {
        //[].slice(0) would soft clone
        ret = src.slice();
        var i = ret.length;
        while (i--){
            ret[i] = deepCopy(ret[i], _visited);
        }
        return ret;
    }
    //Date
    if (src instanceof Date){
        return new Date(src.getTime());
    }
    //RegExp
    if(src instanceof RegExp){
        return new RegExp(src);
    }
    //DOM Elements
    if(src.nodeType && typeof src.cloneNode == 'function'){
        return src.cloneNode(true);
    }

    //If we've reached here, we have a regular object, array, or function

    //make sure the returned object has the same prototype as the original
    var proto = (Object.getPrototypeOf ? Object.getPrototypeOf(src): src.__proto__);
    if (!proto) {
        proto = src.constructor.prototype; //this line would probably only be reached by very old browsers 
    }
    var ret = object_create(proto);

    for(var key in src){
        //Note: this does NOT preserve ES5 property attributes like 'writable', 'enumerable', etc.
        //For an example of how this could be modified to do so, see the singleMixin() function
        ret[key] = deepCopy(src[key], _visited);
    }
    return ret;
}

//If Object.create isn't already defined, we just do the simple shim,
//without the second argument, since that's all we need here
var object_create = Object.create;
if (typeof object_create !== 'function') {
    object_create = function(o) {
        function F() {}
        F.prototype = o;
        return new F();
    };
}
share|improve this answer

In Prototype you would do something like

newObject = Object.clone(myObject);

The Prototype documentation notes that this makes a shallow copy.

share|improve this answer
2  
I advocate deleting this and all other answers which are just one-line references to a utility library's .clone(...) method. Every major library will have them, and the repeated brief non-detailed answers aren't useful to most visitors, who won't be using that particular library. – Jeremy Banks Apr 7 at 17:25

Crockford suggests (and I prefer) using this function:

function object(o) {
    function F() {}
    F.prototype = o;
    return new F();
}

var newObject = object(oldObject);

It's terse, works as expected and you don't need a library.


EDIT:

This is a polyfill for Object.create, so you also can use this.

var newObject = Object.create(oldObject);

NOTE: If you use some of this, you may have problems with some iteration who use hasOwnProperty. Because, create create new empty object who inherits oldObject. But it is still useful and practical for cloning objects.

For exemple if oldObject.a = 5;

newObject.a; // is 5

but:

oldObject.hasOwnProperty(a); // is true
newObject.hasOwnProperty(a); // is false
share|improve this answer
9  
correct me if I am wrong, but isn't that Crockford's beget function for prototypal inheritance? How does it apply to clone? – Alex Nolasco Oct 6 '10 at 15:17
3  
Yes, I was afraid of this discussion: What is the practical difference between clone, copy and prototypal inheritance, when should you use each and which functions on this page are actually doing what? I found this SO page by googling "javascript copy object". What I was really looking for was the function above, so I came back to share. My guess is the asker was looking for this too. – protonfish Oct 6 '10 at 19:51
43  
Difference between clone/copy and inheritance is, that - using your example, when I change a property of oldObject, the property also gets changed in newObject. If you make a copy, you can do what you want with oldObject without changing newObject. – Ridcully Dec 6 '10 at 13:13
13  
This will break the hasOwnProperty check so its a pretty hacky way to clone an object and will give you unexpected results. – Corban Brook Mar 16 '11 at 18:17
    
var extendObj = function(childObj, parentObj) { var tmpObj = function () {} tmpObj.prototype = parentObj.prototype; childObj.prototype = new tmpObj(); childObj.prototype.constructor = childObj; }; ... davidshariff.com/blog/javascript-inheritance-patterns – Cody Apr 24 '14 at 18:32

Shallow copy one-liner (ECMAScript 5th edition):

var origin = { foo : {} };
var copy = Object.keys(origin).reduce(function(c,k){c[k]=origin[k];return c;},{});

console.log(origin, copy);
console.log(origin == copy); // false
console.log(origin.foo == copy.foo); // true

And shallow copy one-liner (ECMAScript 6th edition, 2015):

var origin = { foo : {} };
var copy = Object.assign({}, origin);

console.log(origin, copy);
console.log(origin == copy); // false
console.log(origin.foo == copy.foo); // true
share|improve this answer
3  
This may be fine for simple objects, but it only copies property values. It does not touch the prototype chain and by using Object.keys it skips non-enumerable and inherited properties. Also, it loses property descriptors by doing direct assignment. – Matt Bierner Nov 23 '13 at 17:51
    
If you copy the prototype too, you'd be missing only non-enumerables and property descriptors, yes? Pretty good. :) – sam Jun 8 '14 at 6:24
    
Performance aside, this is a really convenient way to shallow copy an object. I often use this to sort of fake rest properties in a destructuring assignment in my React components. – mjohnsonengr Mar 17 at 13:56
function clone(obj)
 { var clone = {};
   clone.prototype = obj.prototype;
   for (property in obj) clone[property] = obj[property];
   return clone;
 }
share|improve this answer
10  
The problem with method, that if you have sub objects within the obj, their references will be cloned, and not the values of every sub object. – Kamarey Jun 25 '09 at 7:46
1  
just make it recursive so the sub objects will be cloned deeply. – fiatjaf Jan 25 '13 at 22:38
    
just curious ... wont be the clone variable will have the pointers to the properties of the original object? because it seems no new memory allocation – Rupesh Patel Feb 4 '13 at 9:42
2  
Yes. This is just a shallow copy, so the clone will point to the exact same objects pointed-to by the original object. – Mark Cidade Feb 4 '13 at 10:18

Lodash has a nice _.cloneDeep method: http://lodash.com/docs#cloneDeep

The usual _.clone method also accepts a second parameter to make a deep copy instead of the shallow one: http://lodash.com/docs#clone

_.clone(value [, deep=false, callback, thisArg])
share|improve this answer
    
I advocate deleting this and all other answers which are just one-line references to a utility library's .clone(...) method. Every major library will have them, and the repeated brief non-detailed answers aren't useful to most visitors, who won't be using that particular library. – Jeremy Banks Apr 7 at 17:23

There seems to be no ideal deep clone operator yet for array-like objects. As the code below illustrates, John Resig's jQuery cloner turns arrays with non-numeric properties into objects that are not arrays, and RegDwight's JSON cloner drops the non-numeric properties. The following tests illustrate these points on multiple browsers:

function jQueryClone(obj) {
   return jQuery.extend(true, {}, obj)
}

function JSONClone(obj) {
   return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj))
}

var arrayLikeObj = [[1, "a", "b"], [2, "b", "a"]];
arrayLikeObj.names = ["m", "n", "o"];
var JSONCopy = JSONClone(arrayLikeObj);
var jQueryCopy = jQueryClone(arrayLikeObj);

alert("Is arrayLikeObj an array instance?" + (arrayLikeObj instanceof Array) +
      "\nIs the jQueryClone an array instance? " + (jQueryCopy instanceof Array) +
      "\nWhat are the arrayLikeObj names? " + arrayLikeObj.names +
      "\nAnd what are the JSONClone names? " + JSONCopy.names)
share|improve this answer
14  
as others have pointed out in comments to Resig's answer, if you want to clone an array-like object you change the {} to [] in the extend call, eg jQuery.extend(true, [], obj) – Anentropic Mar 3 '11 at 21:27
    
JSON.stringify not work with functions – Vlada Mar 12 at 15:08

I have two good answers depending on whether your objective is to clone a "plain old JavaScript object" or not.

Let's also assume that your intention is to create a complete clone with no prototype references back to the source object. If you're not interested in a complete clone, then you can use many of the Object.clone() routines provided in some of the other answers (Crockford's pattern).

For plain old JavaScript objects, a tried and true good way to clone an object in modern runtimes is quite simply:

var clone = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj));

Note that the source object must be a pure JSON object. This is to say, all of its nested properties must be scalars (like boolean, string, array, object, etc). Any functions or special objects like RegExp or Date will not be cloned.

Is it efficient? Heck yes. We've tried all kinds of cloning methods and this works best. I'm sure some ninja could conjure up a faster method. But I suspect we're talking about marginal gains.

This approach is just simple and easy to implement. Wrap it into a convenience function and if you really need to squeeze out some gain, go for at a later time.

Now, for non-plain JavaScript objects, there isn't a really simple answer. In fact, there can't be because of the dynamic nature of JavaScript functions and inner object state. Deep cloning a JSON structure with functions inside requires you recreate those functions and their inner context. And JavaScript simply doesn't have a standardized way of doing that.

The correct way to do this, once again, is via a convenience method that you declare and reuse within your code. The convenience method can be endowed with some understanding of your own objects so you can make sure to properly recreate the graph within the new object.

We're written our own, but the best general approach I've seen is covered here:

http://davidwalsh.name/javascript-clone

This is the right idea. The author (David Walsh) has commented out the cloning of generalized functions. This is something you might choose to do, depending on your use case.

The main idea is that you need to special handle the instantiation of your functions (or prototypal classes, so to speak) on a per-type basis. Here, he's provided a few examples for RegExp and Date.

Not only is this code brief, but it's also very readable. It's pretty easy to extend.

Is this efficient? Heck yes. Given that the goal is to produce a true deep-copy clone, then you're going to have to walk the members of the source object graph. With this approach, you can tweak exactly which child members to treat and how to manually handle custom types.

So there you go. Two approaches. Both are efficient in my view.

share|improve this answer

The following creates two instances of the same object. I found it and am using it currently. It's simple and easy to use.

var objToCreate = (JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(cloneThis)));
share|improve this answer
    
Is there anything wrong with this answer? It's more useful as being a standalone solution, yet simple; but jQuery solution is more popular. Why is that? – ceremcem Sep 24 '15 at 17:15
    
Yes please let me know. It seems to be working as intended, if there is some hidden breakage somewhere, I need to use a different solution. – nathan rogers Sep 25 '15 at 15:34
    
This is THE BEST and most concise answer. Thank you! – jathanism Nov 20 '15 at 3:04
    
For a simple object, this is around 6 times slower in Chrome than the given answer, and gets much slower as the complexity of the object grows. It scales terribly and can bottleneck your application very quickly. – tic Dec 8 '15 at 23:10

This isn't generally the most efficient solution, but it does what I need. Simple test cases below...

function clone(obj, clones) {
    // Makes a deep copy of 'obj'. Handles cyclic structures by
    // tracking cloned obj's in the 'clones' parameter. Functions 
    // are included, but not cloned. Functions members are cloned.
    var new_obj,
        already_cloned,
        t = typeof obj,
        i = 0,
        l,
        pair; 

    clones = clones || [];

    if (obj === null) {
        return obj;
    }

    if (t === "object" || t === "function") {

        // check to see if we've already cloned obj
        for (i = 0, l = clones.length; i < l; i++) {
            pair = clones[i];
            if (pair[0] === obj) {
                already_cloned = pair[1];
                break;
            }
        }

        if (already_cloned) {
            return already_cloned; 
        } else {
            if (t === "object") { // create new object
                new_obj = new obj.constructor();
            } else { // Just use functions as is
                new_obj = obj;
            }

            clones.push([obj, new_obj]); // keep track of objects we've cloned

            for (key in obj) { // clone object members
                if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                    new_obj[key] = clone(obj[key], clones);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return new_obj || obj;
}

Cyclic array test...

a = []
a.push("b", "c", a)
aa = clone(a)
aa === a //=> false
aa[2] === a //=> false
aa[2] === a[2] //=> false
aa[2] === aa //=> true

Function test...

f = new Function
f.a = a
ff = clone(f)
ff === f //=> true
ff.a === a //=> false
share|improve this answer

For future reference, the current draft of ECMAScript 6 introduces Object.assign as a way of cloning objects. Example code would be:

var obj1 = { a: true, b: 1 };
var obj2 = Object.assign(obj1);
console.log(obj2); // { a: true, b: 1 }

At the time of writing support is limited to Firefox 34 in browsers so it’s not usable in production code just yet (unless you’re writing a Firefox extension of course).

share|improve this answer
    
You probably meant obj2 = Object.assign({}, obj1). Your current code is equivalent to obj2 = obj1. – Oriol Jan 25 '15 at 11:10

I usually use var newObj = JSON.parse( JSON.stringify(oldObje) ); but, here's a more proper way:

var o = {};

var oo = Object.create(o);

(o === oo); // => false

Watch legacy browsers!

share|improve this answer
    
The second way needs a Prototype, I prefer the first way, even if it's not the best one on performance due to you can use with a lot of browsers and with Node JS. – Hola Soy Edu Feliz Navidad May 3 '14 at 10:03
    
shouldn't be var oo = Object.create(o) ? – Bart Calixto Jul 31 '14 at 15:46
    
Bart 5, absolutely right. Much thanks for the note. – Cody Jul 31 '14 at 20:47
    
That's cool and all but suppose o has a property a. Now does oo.hasOwnProperty('a')? – user420667 Mar 29 at 23:54
    
No -- o is essentially added as a prototype of oo. This is likely not going to be the desired behavior, which is why 99.9% of the serialize() methods I write use the JSON approach mentioned above. I basically always use JSON, and there're other caveats exposed when using Object.create. – Cody Mar 30 at 2:30

Here is a comprehensive clone() method that can clone any JavaScript object. It handles almost all the cases:

function clone(src, deep) {

    var toString = Object.prototype.toString;
    if (!src && typeof src != "object") {
        // Any non-object (Boolean, String, Number), null, undefined, NaN
        return src;
    }

    // Honor native/custom clone methods
    if (src.clone && toString.call(src.clone) == "[object Function]") {
        return src.clone(deep);
    }

    // DOM elements
    if (src.nodeType && toString.call(src.cloneNode) == "[object Function]") {
        return src.cloneNode(deep);
    }

    // Date
    if (toString.call(src) == "[object Date]") {
        return new Date(src.getTime());
    }

    // RegExp
    if (toString.call(src) == "[object RegExp]") {
        return new RegExp(src);
    }

    // Function
    if (toString.call(src) == "[object Function]") {

        //Wrap in another method to make sure == is not true;
        //Note: Huge performance issue due to closures, comment this :)
        return (function(){
            src.apply(this, arguments);
        });
    }

    var ret, index;
    //Array
    if (toString.call(src) == "[object Array]") {
        //[].slice(0) would soft clone
        ret = src.slice();
        if (deep) {
            index = ret.length;
            while (index--) {
                ret[index] = clone(ret[index], true);
            }
        }
    }
    //Object
    else {
        ret = src.constructor ? new src.constructor() : {};
        for (var prop in src) {
            ret[prop] = deep
                ? clone(src[prop], true)
                : src[prop];
        }
    }
    return ret;
};
share|improve this answer
    
It converts primitives into wrapper objects, not a good solution in most cases. – Danubian Sailor Aug 1 '14 at 9:58
    
@DanubianSailor - I don't think it does...it seems to return primitives right away from the start, and doesn't seem to be doing anything to them that would turn them into wrapper objects as they are returned. – Jimbo Jonny Feb 2 at 18:06

Cloning an object using today's JavaScript: ECMAScript 2015 (formerly known as ECMAScript 6)

var original = {a: 1};

// Method 1: New object with original assigned.
var copy1 = Object.assign({}, original);

// Method 2: New object with spread operator assignment.
var copy2 = {...original};

Old browsers may not support ECMAScript 2015. A common solution is to use a JavaScript-to-JavaScript compiler like Babel to output an ECMAScript 5 version of your JavaScript code.

As pointed out by @jim-hall, this is only a shallow copy. Properties of properties are copied as a reference: changing one would change the value in the other object/instance.

share|improve this answer
2  
This doesn't address deep merges. gist.github.com/jimbol/5d5a3e3875c34abcf60a – Jim Hall Mar 25 at 18:10

// obj target object, vals source object

var setVals = function (obj, vals) {
if (obj && vals) {
      for (var x in vals) {
        if (vals.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
          if (obj[x] && typeof vals[x] === 'object') {
            obj[x] = setVals(obj[x], vals[x]);
          } else {
            obj[x] = vals[x];
          }
        }
      }
    }
    return obj;
  };
share|improve this answer

This is the fastest method I have created that doesn't use the prototype, so it will maintain hasOwnProperty in the new object.

The solution is to iterate the top level properties of the original object, make two copies, delete each property from the original and then reset the original object and return the new copy. It only has to iterate as many times as top level properties. This saves all the if conditions to check if each property is a function, object, string, etc., and doesn't have to iterate each descendant property.

The only drawback is that the original object must be supplied with its original created namespace, in order to reset it.

copyDeleteAndReset:function(namespace,strObjName){
    var obj = namespace[strObjName],
    objNew = {},objOrig = {};
    for(i in obj){
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(i)){
            objNew[i] = objOrig[i] = obj[i];
            delete obj[i];
        }
    }
    namespace[strObjName] = objOrig;
    return objNew;
}

var namespace = {};
namespace.objOrig = {
    '0':{
        innerObj:{a:0,b:1,c:2}
    }
}

var objNew = copyDeleteAndReset(namespace,'objOrig');
objNew['0'] = 'NEW VALUE';

console.log(objNew['0']) === 'NEW VALUE';
console.log(namespace.objOrig['0']) === innerObj:{a:0,b:1,c:2};
share|improve this answer

Just because I didn't see AngularJS mentioned and thought that people might want to know...

angular.copy also provides a method of deep copying objects and arrays.

share|improve this answer

protected by adarshr Jul 31 '12 at 20:59

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