Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 5 functions defined in a class. In another class I have a multiple looped structure that tries computing the time taken my each of the aforementioned functions on a input file containing many strings.

I want the output such that for each entry of the input file, the average time taken by each function over 10 calls is computed and printed out. So, the output should be like -

inputString | function1AvgTime | f2AvgTime and so on.

I cannot figure out an elegant way to call all these 5 functions 10 times each for a single input string. Right now what i seem to be doing is this -

    for (inputString):
         for (iteration 1 to 10):
             call function 1
         for (iteration 1 to 10):
             call function2
    and so on....

Is there a way to store the function names in an array or some datastructure, and call them within a single iteration loop? My work is getting done anyway. I'm just curious if there is a better design.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the Runnable interface,

void runMultipleTimes(Runnable run, int times) {
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        run.run();
    }
}

Then use anonymous local classes to wrap the individual functions, i.e.

runMultipleTimes(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    void run() {
        function1();
    }
}, 10 /* how often to run */);

This is somewhat in line with the Java API. Runnable is a key interface used by Java all over the place. At the same time, it usually is only executed once, I believe. So it's up to you to ensure it can be run multiple times!

But so far, you have gained not much over the explicit for loop, except the ability to store the Runnables in a collection:

for (Runnable run : runCollection) {
    runMultipleTimes(run, 100);
}

If you want to avoid writing the Runnables yourself, your can use Java reflection to get the methods by String name, or even via full introspection. Essentially, you'd then write one Runnable that executes one java.lang.reflect.Method. The Runnable approach is a bit more flexible, because you can also do things such as:

runCollection.add(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    void run() {
        function(123456);
    }
});

runCollection.add(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    void run() {
        function(654321);
    }
});

To run the same functions with different parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds good! Let me try this and get back. Thanks! –  sneha Aug 31 '12 at 9:14
    
+1 for the Runnable suggestion, better than my answer (which I'll delete). I'll reiterate my distaste for any reflection-based solutions, however. –  Duncan Aug 31 '12 at 12:47
    
That is why I emphasized the String there. Using reflection essentially means referencing methods by strings instead of bytecode. And why I added the example with parameters (and passing parameters to methods obtained by reflection is really messy). –  Anony-Mousse Aug 31 '12 at 14:20
    
This worked like a charm! Thank you! :) –  sneha Sep 3 '12 at 10:35
add comment

You might want to look at reflection: http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/.

It allows you to inspect the members of a class and call the ones you want. In particular, look at the "Invoking Methods by Name" section in the link above.

share|improve this answer
    
that is somewhere around what I want. –  sneha Aug 31 '12 at 9:17
    
I would never call using reflection "elegant", mind. –  Duncan Aug 31 '12 at 12:45
    
I agree - I always write reflection code with a one-eyed-squint and a bad gut feeling. It can be useful for writing some basic automated tests that don't require you to write boileplate. So - literal answer to "function names in an array or some datastructure, and call them within a single iteration loop?" - reflection. "curious if there is a better design" - Runnable. I'll +1 @Anony-Mousse's answer for those reasons too ;) –  mtsvetkov Aug 31 '12 at 13:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.