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I have an interface and some implementations. But in one implementation i have a specify functionality using only in that implementation.

class Interface
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
}

class D1 : public Interface
{
    void foo() {}
}

class D2 : public Interface
{
    void foo() {}
    void bar() {}
}

So i have a D2::bar() function only in D2, and it specified only for D2 implementation. What is the right way using OOP to write that kind of stuff?

In my client code i have a call: Interface* i; i->foo();

But if it is D2 in "i" i need to call bar() function in some cases.

share|improve this question
    
are you inheriting D1 and D2 from Interface? – Jeeva Aug 31 '12 at 7:51
    
Yes, sorry, i forgot inheritance. Fixed. – fryme Aug 31 '12 at 8:07
    
You must define virtual destructor in Interface, otherwise you're in danger. – Nawaz Aug 31 '12 at 8:17

If you need to call the bar function, you need to have a reference to an object that knows about bar.

So, either you reference a D2 object or your Interface must include a bar function. In the later case, your D1 must implement it as well, but the implementation can be empty or return an error value.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, i have 1 interface and 5 implementations. And only in ONE implementation i have some specific functions. You said, that i need to implement it only in one case and in others write something like: void bar() {}. But i think it is not correct way to resolve that problem. – fryme Aug 31 '12 at 8:00
1  
there is something wrong with your design, then. It is weird that you need one specific function at a specific point that make no sense at all for other implementations of the interface. When you use the interface, it should be in a context where all you need to know is your interface, and your interface should be able to do all you need from it. – njzk2 Aug 31 '12 at 8:16

If you insist on using interfaces, you should move bar into a dedicated interface and then let clients use that:

class FooInterface {
public:
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class BarInterface {
public:
    virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class D1 : public FooInterface {
public:
    void foo() {}
};

class D2 : public FooInterface,
           public BarInterface {
public:
    void foo() {}
    void bar() {}
};

Your client code needing a bar implementation could then take a BarInterface.

share|improve this answer
    
But in client apps i have code using only one interface. For example an "array of Interfaces" and some code to work with it. – fryme Aug 31 '12 at 8:03

Assuming that you inherit D1 and D2 from Interface. you can use cast to convert base pointer to derived object and use it, provided the base pointer points to D2

share|improve this answer
    
Client did not know anything about realization of interface. – fryme Aug 31 '12 at 8:06
    
@fryme: Yes client need not know anything about it – Jeeva Aug 31 '12 at 8:54

If you are prepared to have some generic implementation in your interface you put an empty implementation of bar() in your interface:

class Interface
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
    virtual void bar() {}
}

class D1 : public Interface
{
    void foo() {}
}

class D2 : public Interface
{
    void foo() {}
    void bar() {}
}

Now when you call Interface i* = blah; i->bar(); if i is a D1 it does nothing, if i is a D2 it will do something D2 specific.

share|improve this answer
class _interface
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

class _abstract : public _interface
{
public:
    _abstract(){}
    virtual ~_abstract(){};

    virtual void foo() = 0;
    int get_type()
    {
        return i_type;
    }

protected:
    int i_type;
};

class D1 : public _abstract
{
public:
    D1(){
        i_type = 1;
    }
    ~D1(){}

    void foo() {
        // do something
    }
};

class D2 : public _abstract
{
public:
    D2(){
        i_type = 2;
    }
    ~D2(){}

    void foo() {
        // do something
    }

    void bar() {
        // do something
    }
};
int main()
{
    D1 d_one;
    D2 d_two;

    _abstract* ab = &d_one;
    cout << ab->get_type() << "D1" << endl;

    ab = &d_two;
    cout << ab->get_type() << "D2" << endl;

    return 0;
}

You can identify which child by get_type(). So, you know what time you can use bar(). I don't what is the best approach.

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