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what if I would have something like this:

public static void DoSomething()
{
  try
  { 
    //some code
    try
    {
      //some other code
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      log.Error("At the end something is wrong: " + e);
      FunctionA(); //same function as in the first exception
    }
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
    log.Error("At the start something wrong: " + e);
    FunctionA();
  }
}

So I have one try catch in another. The exceptions should be different and I want to handel them with the logger different. But let say I would like to call the same function for both of the exceptions. I have to write FunctionA() 2 times. Is this alright? Or is there any other problem with this type of exception? Suggestions?

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1  
Why not just catch the specific exceptions instead of using Exception e in the catch statement? –  dtsg Aug 31 '12 at 8:10
1  
Your code doesn't compile. Maybe you should show us your real code to get useful answers. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 31 '12 at 8:10
    
I moved the brace for you –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 8:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use single try block with multiple catch blocks; and also you can use finally statements to execute some code section whether there is an exception or not.

Using multiple try-catch blocks inside a function is generally not a good idea. Also, it is better to handle an exception at the placed it occured.

public static void DoSomething()
{
  try
  { 
    //some code
  }

  catch (ExceptionA e)
  {
    // exception is ExceptionA type
    log.Error("At the end something is wrong: " + e);
    FunctionA(); //same function as in the first exception    
  }
  catch (ExceptionB e)
  {
    // exception is ExceptionB type
    log.Error("At the start something wrong: " + e);
    FunctionA(); //same function as in the first exception    
  }
  finally
  {
        //you can do something here whether there is an exception or not
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@RB.: That's what is happening here. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 31 '12 at 8:28
1  
Disagree with "it is better to handle an exception at the placed it occured." It depends...most of the time it is better to let the exception propagate up the call chain to a higher level exception handler. –  ShellShock Aug 31 '12 at 8:30
1  
@ShellShock I disagree with you. Even if you want to propagate the exception, it is better to handle it at the place it occured, you can propagate it once it is handled. If you do not handle the exception in the place it occured, then you will endup with a fault intolerant system. (ex. if the exception occurs in a db related section, will not have the chance the rollback the transaction). –  daryal Aug 31 '12 at 8:36
1  
@daryal "it is better to handle it at the place it occurred" - Yes it is, but only if you can. There are loads of scenarios where it is perfectly fine to let exceptions propagate straight up without handling them. –  James Aug 31 '12 at 8:44
1  
It all depends what you mean by handle. If "Handle" means make it like it never happended, or perform some specific remedial action then, this should be done locally, that is normally the only place this can be done. If it is some generic logging this should be at the top of your stack, so you can code it once. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 8:51

So you want to call a method in all exceptional cases. Then i would use a Boolean variable to store if all executed successfully. Then you can call FunctionA at the end accordingly:

public static void DoSomething()
{
    bool success = true;
    try
    {
        //some code
        try
        {
            //some other code
        } catch (Exception ex)
        {
            success = false;
            try
            {
                //some other code
            } catch (ExceptionA eA)
            {
                log.Error("At the end, something went wrong: " + eA);
            } catch (ExceptionB eB)
            {
                log.Error("At the end, something else went wrong: " + eB);
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception ex)
    {
        success = false;
        log.Error("At the start something wrong: " + ex);
    }

    if(!success)
        FunctionA();
}

But if you instead want to call this method in any case, that means regardless whether an exception was raised, then you can use finally. It is also useful if you want to clean resources.

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You could put your code into a reusble method e.g.

public void LogIfSomeException(Action action, string message)
{
    try
    {
        action();
    }
    catch (SomeException e)
    {
        log.Error(message + e);
        FunctionA();
    }
}

Which you could use like:

public static void DoSomething()       
{
    LogIfSomeException(() => {
       // start code
       LogIfSomeException(() => {
          // end code
       }, "At the end something is wrong");
    }, "At the start something is wrong");

} 
share|improve this answer
    
A novel use of lambda expressions but I wouldn't like to see it in code I was maintaining. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 8:59
    
@Jodrell It's not the prettiest block of code I will give you that, but sometimes complex problems requires complex code (in fairness, it's not that bad). OTOH sometimes when people see code becoming complex they begin to realise they have a design problem rather than a programming one. –  James Aug 31 '12 at 9:15
    
agreed, that is the real problem here. I would nut suggest any of the solutions offered are elegant. The problem is the local logging. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 9:35

If you change DoSomthing to rethrow the exceptions like this,

public static void DoSomething()
{
  try
  { 
    //some code
    try
    {
      //some other code
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      log.Error("At the end something is wrong: " + e);
      throw;
    }
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
    log.Error("At the start something wrong: " + e);
    throw;
  }
}

This makes some sense because logging the exception is not realy handling it, I'm dubious that FunctionA will do that either but ... . When you call DoSomething, you can catch either exception.

static void CallDoSomething()
{
    try
    {
       DoSomething();
    }
    catch
    {
       FunctionA();
    }
}

Or, if you really want to do it in the same function.

public static void DoSomething()
{
    try
    {
        try
        { 

            // some code

            try
            {

                // some other code

            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                log.Error("At the end something is wrong: " + e);
                throw;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            log.Error("At the start something wrong: " + e);
            throw;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception) // I include the type in the hope it will be more derived.
    {
        FunctionA();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So even if I get an exception at the end "At the end something is wrong" FunctionA() will be called? –  silla Aug 31 '12 at 9:25
    
Yes, the throw will rethrow the exception like you never caught it and it will rise to the next highest handler, in this case the outer try block. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 9:33

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