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Imagine I list a lot of file paths in a Python program, and then want to use it in a terminal.

I could store it into a file.

I could pipe it outside the Python program so bash can read it.

But can is just set some sort of variable so that the current shell (the one running the script) as access to the ouput as an ordinary bash variable ?

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Sound like you want a shared memory among processes. Although I'm not sure if it's possible on you OS, It's not preferred. Use a share external resource(e.g., file) or the pipe things you just mentioned is the way to go IMHO. –  John Wang Aug 31 '12 at 9:02
    
I'm not wondering if it's a good idea. I'm wondering if it's posssible. I know the down sides of sharing data among processes. –  e-satis Aug 31 '12 at 9:16
    
Then you should simple ask "Is shared memory among processes possible ?" ;-). And the answer is sure possible speaking of the possibility. –  John Wang Aug 31 '12 at 9:47

2 Answers 2

You could set an environment variable.

But to have the current shell have access to hit, however, you propably have to use a little hack:

In your python script, create a temporary .sh file which will set the environment variable using export yourname=yourlist, then run and delete it.


Another way would be to use e.g. Unix Domain Sockets using python's socket module, and read it in your shell using socat or netcat or use python's mmap module.

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1  
Not really clean, but smart enough to deserve a +1 –  e-satis Aug 31 '12 at 9:36
    
I think the cleanest way would be to just pipe it :-) –  sloth Aug 31 '12 at 9:44
    
Yeah, that's for sure :-p –  e-satis Aug 31 '12 at 9:47
    
Well, you can it make more ugly: If your script runs inside a X session, just use xclip :-) –  sloth Aug 31 '12 at 9:56
    
Of make some kind of buffer overflow... –  e-satis Aug 31 '12 at 10:20
  1. Create a python program to print the files to stdout
  2. Execute the python script using backticks to store the output of the script in a bash variable

Note the difference in accessing the bash variable using "$var" preserves the newlines whilst using plain $var changes them to spaces.

paddy$ echo $SHELL
/bin/bash
paddy$ unset frompython 
paddy$ cat alltxt.py 
from glob import glob
print("\n".join(glob("*.txt")))
paddy$ python alltxt.py 
entry3.txt
entry2.txt
test_in2.txt
infile.txt
test_in.txt
entry.txt
entry1.txt
testfile.txt
paddy$ frompython=`python alltxt.py`
paddy$ echo $frompython
entry3.txt entry2.txt test_in2.txt infile.txt test_in.txt entry.txt entry1.txt testfile.txt
paddy$ echo "$frompython"
entry3.txt
entry2.txt
test_in2.txt
infile.txt
test_in.txt
entry.txt
entry1.txt
testfile.txt
paddy$ 
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Which is like piping. But +1 since it does try to answer the questin. –  e-satis Aug 31 '12 at 12:25

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