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I have a class which should function as an entity class (as in DDD). It basically looks like this:

public class Page
{
    protected String Name;
    protected String Description;
    protected Dictionary<int, IField> Fields = new Dictionary<int, IField>();

    protected Page SetName(String name)
    {
        this.Name = name;
        return this;
    }

    protected Page SetDescription(String description)
    {
        this.Description = description;
        return this;
    }

    public Page AddField(IField field)
    {
        this.Fields.add(xxx, Field); //xxx = just some id
        return this;
    }
}

Now my question is, is this a valid entity class?

I'd need to keep the method chaining, so please don't go into too much detail about that (even if you think it's wrong).

My main concern is, can an entity class contain methods, such as getters and setters? And especially a method like AddField?

The AddField method takes an object of the type IField. I store that in a dictionary inside the Page class. That's an aggregate then, right?

Doesn't that changes the state of the entity, making it not a real entity class?

Or is it just fine the way it is?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My main concern is, can an entity class contain methods, such as getters and setters? And especially a method like AddField?

An entity can contain getters, setters, adders, behavior and business rules (recommended)... basically anything you want.

The AddField method takes an object of the type IField. I store that in a dictionary inside the Page class. That's an aggregate then, right?

No, it might be an aggregate root but not necessarily. It depends on your context and how you design your aggregates. See http://dddcommunity.org/library/vernon_2011

Doesn't that changes the state of the entity, making it not a real entity class?

It's the very nature of entities to change state, that's why we give them IDs to track changes. Value objects, on the other hand, can be made immutable because their identity doesn't matter, most of the time you don't modify a value object but just create a new one.

If you want to go the DDD route, I suggest you read the blue book or a summary to get a basic comprehension of the approach. DDD has its own principles and design patterns - cherrypicking a few of them doesn't always make sense when you don't adopt the whole paradigm or at least get the intent behind it.

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I think your class looks fine and you're not making the schoolboy error that most people do, in which you have a getter for the dictionary (so you're properly encapsulating and hiding the Dictionary).

I'm assuming that you identify a Page by its name, so that becomes the id, which is needed for an entity.

Regarding what is an aggregate. The Page class looks like an aggregate root, as you control access to the children (IField) through the Page class.

I can't say much more... it looks fine.

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