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I have created a fluent builder style pattern for helping with data loading my tests. The order of certain methods is important and was wondering what the preferred method to managing the correct sequence is.

I have the following at the moment:

using NUnit.Framework;

[TestFixture]
public class DataBuilderTests
{
    [Test]
    public void Can_NAME()
    {
        new DataLoader()
            .Start() // must be called first
            .Setup() // then called next
            .LoadEmployees() // optional order not NB
            .LoadProducts() // optional order not NB
            .StartCleanup() // begin cleanup
            .CleanupEmployees() // optional order not NB
            .CleanupProducts() // optional order not NB
            .End();
    }
}

public class DataLoader
{
    public DataBuilderSetup Start()
    {
        return new DataBuilderSetup(this);       
    }
}

public class DataBuilderSetup
{
    private readonly DataLoader _dataLoader;

    public DataBuilderSetup(DataLoader dataLoader)
    {
        _dataLoader = dataLoader;
    }

    public DataBuilderOptions Setup()
    {
        // do setup
        return new DataBuilderOptions(_dataLoader);
    }
}

public class DataBuilderOptions
{
    private readonly DataLoader _dataLoader;

    public DataBuilderOptions(DataLoader dataLoader)
    {
        _dataLoader = dataLoader;
    }

    public DataBuilderOptions LoadEmployees()
    {
        // load
        return this;
    }

    public DataBuilderOptions LoadProducts()
    {
        // load
        return this;
    }

    public DataBuilderCleanupOptions StartCleanup()
    {
        return new DataBuilderCleanupOptions(_dataLoader);
    }
}

public class DataBuilderCleanupOptions
{
    private readonly DataLoader _dataLoader;

    public DataBuilderCleanupOptions(DataLoader dataLoader)
    {
        _dataLoader = dataLoader;
    }

    public DataBuilderCleanupOptions CleanupEmployees()
    {
        // cleanup
        return this;
    }

    public DataBuilderCleanupOptions CleanupProducts()
    {
        // cleanup
        return this;
    }

    public DataLoader End()
    {
        return _dataLoader;
    }
}
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What's wrong with your current solution? –  Danny Chen Aug 31 '12 at 9:42
    
Nothing, just something I came up with this morning and was curious as to how others handled the scenario –  Chev Aug 31 '12 at 9:44
    
Does CleanupEmployees have to be called if LoadEmployees is called? –  Danny Chen Aug 31 '12 at 9:45
    
Preferably yes, but too complicated to validate at this stage –  Chev Aug 31 '12 at 9:51

5 Answers 5

A part of the BuilderPattern's strengths is that it can shield consumers from imposed 'magic' ordering of method calls.

I would recommend changing your design so that either:

  • All necessary arguments are provided up front to shield consumers from the enforced ordered calls to Start and Setup.
  • Modify the responsibilities of your entities so that they can be built up arbitrarily.

Obviously this is my personal preference. If this type forms part of a library that will be consumed by third parties then i would strongly recommend removing the need for magic method ordering. If this is only likely to be used in house then it is up to you to weigh up the costs associated with changing your code vs not doing so.

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Interestingly, what started my thinking were 3rd party libs like FluentNHibernate, FluentValidation and NHibernate itself which seem to do this. –  Chev Aug 31 '12 at 9:50
    
Agree, it defeats one of the main purposes of a builder to have to call methods in a certain order just to configure it. The builder should cache the parts and then sort it out in the final Build call. –  tcarvin Aug 31 '12 at 12:45

You can add a private queue member to the builder, for example Queue<string> and add names of the operation on every builder step.

.Build() method or in your case .End() will check the queue for containing the right operation names in a correct order. If not you can throw an InvalidOperationException

Also you can use a tree as a data structure. A tree will allow you to dissect options that are not available given previous builder steps.

But better consider other answers as my approach is actually a hack and it will create a maintenance issue.

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The preferred way is to avoid it at all costs. Design your builder so its obvious what needs to be done.

ObjectBuilder
.Init()
.Optional1()
.Optional3()
.Optional2()
.ToObject()

If something needs to happen first then do this in the constructor or factory method. Then always have one method that completes the build process, cleanup and all.

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I do this at the moment, but imagine a scenario where a choice may only exist if a previous selection is used. Typical scenario is a common OrderBy clause that has a ASC, or DESC option proceeding. These option would only exist if OrderBy is selected. –  Chev Aug 31 '12 at 9:48
    
@Chev - That's actually a very different scenario. What you describe is actually chaining builders. In that case you wouldn't be able to add a new where predicate because you are dealing with a new builder. The path of construction would remain unambiguous. –  ChaosPandion Aug 31 '12 at 9:55

Your current solution is the approach that I would take to provide a fluent syntax, though I would not necessarily say it exactly follows the builder pattern. Essentially, what you are doing is chaining builders together with restrictions provided by a state machine. I see very little difference in what you are doing than with any other commonly accepted fluent configuration, such as fluent hibernate or fluent assertions.

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In Java (C# and its multiple inheritance shouldn't make it any different) you could do it that way:

declare set of interfaces, that contain one method only:

Interface DoFirstThing { // could be renamed to "BuilderOnStart" or "BuilderStartingState"
    DoSecondThing doFirst();
}

Interface DoSecondThing {
    DoLastThing doSecond();
}

Interface DoLastThing {
    BuilderReady doLast();
}

Interface BuilderReady {
    Result build();
}

class BuilderWithForcedSequence implements DoFirstThing, DoSecondThing, DoLastThing, BuilderReady {

     // implement all

}

and finally you would need some factory or factory method to set the initial state for that builder:

public DoFirstThing createNewBuilderWithForcedSequence(requiredParameters){
    return new BuilderWithForcedSequence(requiredParameters);
}

This would produce Builder, with forced ordering of building methods (they should be renamed from doThat to something meaningful), that can call only doFirst(), after that doSecond() ... and so on, till final state, when obiect would be build, using build() method.

Result result = builder.doFirst().doSecond().doLast().build();


EDIT:
Oops, that's pretty exact your approach :)

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