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This compiles when using clang -std=gnu++11 -c test.cpp:

void test() {
    [[random text here]]
    if (0) {
    }
}

But this gives error main.cpp:3:1: error: expected statement:

void test() {
    [[random text here]]
}

If I compile with clang -std=gnu++11 -S -emit-llvm main.cpp and look at the LLVM code it looks like the [[...]] line has no effect:

define void @_Z5testv() nounwind uwtable ssp {
  ret void
}

Any ideas why? bug or some C++11 syntax or GNU extension syntax?

Im using clang from Xcode 4.4.1 (Apple clang version 4.0 (tags/Apple/clang-421.0.60) (based on LLVM 3.1svn).

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1  
[[random text here]] Is that a literal description of exactly what you put in the code, or is that a placeholder for something? I just want to clarify that. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 31 '12 at 10:09
1  
no placeholder that is the exact source code –  Mattias Wadman Aug 31 '12 at 10:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is using C++11's attribute syntax. "random text here" is therefore assumed to be an attribute. By the C++11 specification, an attribute can modify many statements and declarations.

Attributes can be statements, but they have to actually be statements. Meaning they end in a ; just like many other C++ statements.

The set of attributes supported by an implementation is implementation-defined (and Clang doesn't support any. Indeed, it apparently isn't supposed to support attribute syntax at all, according to the website). Attributes not implemented by a particular implementation should be ignored, which is why it has no effect.

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Thanks! I stumbled upon this in some Objective-C++ code where someone had accidentally typed [[NSValue alloc]] alone on a line :) –  Mattias Wadman Aug 31 '12 at 12:28
1  
Clang does support C++11 attribute syntax, and even supports a non-standard attribute: clang::fallthrough. Clang does actually make some use of the standard attributes as well. For example it can produce a warning for a function marked [[noreturn]] that actually does return, and codegen is actually affected. I imagine that not everything is complete so it's not marked yet. –  bames53 Aug 31 '12 at 19:17
    
@bames53: That's odd, since their website simply says "no". Not even a partial or something. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 31 '12 at 19:18
1  
@Nicol: The website doesn't talk about SVN stuff IIRC. –  Xeo Aug 31 '12 at 19:58

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