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i have a class called gameObject and one of it's properties in called component and is of type object:

public object component;

and i'm trying to use this object to act as an object that can hold object of any class you give it. for example

unit c = new unit(...)
gameObject test = new gameObject(...)
test.component = c;

and i want to use the c object through the component object. for example

if(test.component==typeof(unit))
    test.component.Draw();//draw is a function of the unit object

is this possible to do? and how do i do it?

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What are the range of types you might assign as a component? Can you think of a common set of behaviors that they should have? –  ChaosPandion Aug 31 '12 at 10:02
    
If you use generics you can make component a strongtyped property. –  Maarten Aug 31 '12 at 10:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, it's called casting. Like this:

if(test.component is unit)
  ((unit)test.component).Draw();
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thanks :) i though i had it all wrong –  user1494136 Aug 31 '12 at 13:00

typeof(unit) is an object too, and it is different from component. You should do component.GetType() instead:

if(test.component.GetType()==typeof(unit))

This does not check for derived types, but this does:

if(test.component is unit)

Still, this does not let you call Draw without casting. The easiest way to check and cast at the same time is as follows:

unit u = test.component as unit;
if (u != null) {
    u.Draw();
}
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Use an interface and make the unit class implement that interface. Define the Draw() method in the interface and declare the component as the type of the interface you defined.

public interface IDrawable
{
 void Draw();
}

public IDrawable component;

public class unit : IDrawable
...
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if (test.component is unit) ((unit)(test.component)).Draw();

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As others said - you can cast everything to and from Object. But you should use some base class of interface to make sure no one will send you Int32 or some other unsuspected type. But if all supported types have some common method, it's even better to put it in interface. So you can Draw() anything without casting, not even wondering what it really is.

Variant with empty interface just enforcing proper type:

interface IComponent
{
}
class unit : IComponent
{
    //...
}
class enemy : IComponent
{
    //...
}
class gameObject
{
    IComponent component;//now only objects inheriting IComponent can be assigned here

    public void DrawComponent()
    {
        unit u = component as unit;
        if (u != null) {
            u.Draw();
        }
        enemy e = component as enemy;
        if (e != null) {
            e.DrawIfVisible();
        }
    }
}

Variant with interface declaring common features:

interface IDrawable
{
    void Draw();
}
class unit : IDrawable
{
    public void Draw(){;}
    //...
}
class enemy : IDrawable
{
    public void Draw(){;}
    //...
}


class gameObject
{
    IDrawable component;

    public void DrawComponent()
    {
        //now you don't need to care what type component really is
        //it has to be IDrawable to be assigned to test
        //and because it is IDrawable, it has to have Draw() method
        if (component != null) {
            component.Draw();
        }
    }
}
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To use specific behaviour of an object you have to cast it to its specific type. Referencig it with an object variable you can use it only as an object instance.

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