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I have been reading through other questions on here and there is something that has me confused and hopefully it can be explained. I am sure there it is a simple thing but it is alluding me.

So in C++ we have private variables that are only viewable within the class:

class MyClass
{
    private:
        int i;
};

But we can also have unnamed namespaces:

namespace
{
    int i;
}

Both appear to be private to the class but in the 2nd case you cannot see they exist from the header file. From reading other questions it seems that functions are different as you can't pass class objects to them? But I am not sure what the difference is here for variables.

Is there a disadvantage to the 2nd way that means you should still use private variables?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

They aren't the same.

Integer i in the anonymous namespace will be shared by all instances of MyClass.

The private integer i in MyClass will be unique for each instantiation of the class.

The equivalent using private would be to make i static:

//.h
class MyClass
{
    private:
        static int i;
};

And instantiate the one single shared i like this:

//.cpp
int MyClass::i = 0;
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That's pretty obvious now you explain it. I knew they were prefered over statics in some cases but those 2 statements just didn't tie together in my head for some reason :-) Thank you –  Firedragon Aug 31 '12 at 11:01

Namespaces are unrelated to objects/classes. In particular, if you have two objects, each has its own copy of a private variable.

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They are quite different concepts. The private data member is visible only to a class, and in the non-static case, each class instance owns one of these. The anonymous namespace allows you to make code available only to other code in the same file. So in the case of the single int variable, all code defined in the same place as the anonymous namespace would see the same, single variable.

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Both appear to be private to the class ...

No, only the first is private to the class. It's a non-static member variable; one is instantiated in every object of the class type.

The second is not in a class at all; it has static storage duration, so one is instantiated for the whole program. Anything that accesses it is accessing the same variable as anything else that accesses it. Being in an unnamed namespace, it's only accessible within the translation unit (i.e. the source file) that defines it; but it's accessible to any code there, not just a particular class.

Is there a disadvantage to the 2nd way that means you should still use private variables?

If you want a copy of the variable in each class object, then you need it to be a non-static member.

If you want to share it between all objects, then it's up to you whether to make it a static member, or put it in a namespace inside the class's implementation file. I often do the latter to simplify the class definition. Disadvantages are that access isn't restricted just to the class but to anything else in that file, and you can't access it from any code that you might want to put in the header.

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