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I'm trying to make a fragment which would show a zoomable image using TouchImageView(https://github.com/MikeOrtiz/TouchImageView)

The fragment also has a spinner for changing images. The problem is that the first image loads ok, but when i use the scroller to change the image, I get an OutOfMemoryError and the program crashes. Here's my code

public class mapFragment extends SherlockFragment {


String[] Levels = { "Ground Floor", "First Floor",
        "Second Floor", "Third Floor"
};

Button button;
@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup group, Bundle saved)
{
    View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.maps_layout, group, false);


    final TouchImageView img = (TouchImageView) v.findViewById(R.id.touchimage1);
    final Bitmap snoop = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.groundfloor);
    img.setImageBitmap(snoop);




    final Spinner s = (Spinner) v.findViewById(
            R.id.spinnerlevels);

    ArrayAdapter<String> adapter = new ArrayAdapter<String>(this
            .getActivity().getBaseContext(),
            android.R.layout.simple_spinner_item, Levels);
    s.setAdapter(adapter);

    s.setOnItemSelectedListener(new OnItemSelectedListener() {

        public void onItemSelected(AdapterView<?> parent, View view, 
                int pos, long id) {
            // An item was selected. You can retrieve the selected item using
            // parent.getItemAtPosition(pos)
            int item = s.getSelectedItemPosition();



            if(item ==0){
                snoop.recycle();
                Bitmap snoop = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.groundfloor);
                img.setImageBitmap(snoop);
            }
            if(item ==1){
                snoop.recycle();
                Bitmap snoop = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.firstfloor);
                img.setImageBitmap(snoop);
            }
            if(item ==2){
                snoop.recycle();
                Bitmap snoop = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.secondfloor);
                img.setImageBitmap(snoop);
            }
            if(item ==3){
                snoop.recycle();
                Bitmap snoop = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.thirdfloor);
                img.setImageBitmap(snoop);
            }


        }

        public void onNothingSelected(AdapterView<?> parent) {
            // Another interface callback
        }
    });



    img.setMaxZoom(8f);

    return (v);


}

}

Shouldn't "recylce()" remove the first image, to give place to the new one in the memory? The images sizes in MB are 1.4, 1.5, 1.5, 1.3

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More important that size in MB what is the size in width x height? –  Warpzit Aug 31 '12 at 11:18
    
1754*2481 pixels –  lamp ard Aug 31 '12 at 11:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For each pixel of your image your heap use 8 bytes. Now how much memory is 1754 x 2481 x 8? The answer is 32.94 MB of heap memory. On many devices you wont have more than 16 MB heap which is used for other stuff as well. Do you get your problem now?

You need to make the images smaller or your app will never fly :)

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then why does it work smoothly on my old galaxy y(Gingerbread) , while it doesnt on the transormer(ICS) –  lamp ard Aug 31 '12 at 11:58
    
What size does the images have that you use on the old galaxy? Are they taken from ldpi, mdpi or hdpi screen size? –  Warpzit Aug 31 '12 at 12:20
    
drawable-nodpi on all devices –  lamp ard Aug 31 '12 at 12:34
    
waiting for ur answer –  lamp ard Sep 1 '12 at 13:58
    
Well since you use -nodpi it shouldn't work on ldpi screen devices in the first place as they are usually limited to something like 16 mb heap space. My answer is still the same though I'm puzzled how you have it working on inferior phones with -nodpi folder being the folder that is used. –  Warpzit Sep 1 '12 at 20:38

Shouldn't "recylce()" remove the first image, to give place to the new one in the memory?

No, recycle() method simply mark this bitmap as "dead", and it can be garbage collected at some point later. Here is documentation of recycle() method:

Free the native object associated with this bitmap, and clear the reference to the pixel data. This will not free the pixel data synchronously; it simply allows it to be garbage collected if there are no other references. The bitmap is marked as "dead", meaning it will throw an exception if getPixels() or setPixels() is called, and will draw nothing. This operation cannot be reversed, so it should only be called if you are sure there are no further uses for the bitmap. This is an advanced call, and normally need not be called, since the normal GC process will free up this memory when there are no more references to this bitmap.

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