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I've found a challenge on my own understanding of templates, I understand that the source code of a template must be placed into the header file in order to access to all the dependant types where the template is instanced.

So, in this example:

// This code cannot be placed in the cpp file
template <typename T> T foo(T v)
{
    return -v;
}

The body of T foo(T v) MUST be placed in the header file, then, when foo function is instanced somewhere, the "real" body function is created replacing the T symbol with the real type. With this code:

int bar = 5;
float baz = 6.66f;
bar = foo<int>(bar);
baz = foo<float>(baz);

The template instantiation mechanism creates the following functions based on the previously defined template:

int foo(int v)
{
    return -v;
}

float foo(float v)
{
    return -v;
}

But, when we have a template class, the class can have functions that doesn't use the dependant type at all:

template <typename T> class Foo
{
    Foo() : mistery(0), value(0) {}; // We're using the dependant type.
    AddMistery() { ++mistery; }; // We are not using the dependant type.

    int mistery;
    T value;
};

I first figured that the AddMistery method could be placed in the cpp file, because this method isn't using the dependant type, but when I tried it, failed while linking. At this moment I slapped my face remembering that the different instances of template classes are not the same class. So, when the Linker is doing it's job, it looks for the body of the AddMistery method and does not found it because ir is placed into the cpp file:

// Foo.h
template <typename T> class Foo
{
    Foo() : mistery(0), value(0) {}; // We're using the dependant type.
    AddMistery(); // We are not using the dependant type.

    int mistery;
    T value;
};

// Foo.cpp
#include "Foo.h"

template <typename T> Foo<T>::AddMistery()
{
    ++mistery;
}

// Main.cpp
#include "Foo.h"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Foo<int> i;
    Foo<float> f;

    i.AddMistery(); // Link Error, where's the Foo<int>::AddMistery body?
    f.AddMistery(); // Link Error, where's the Foo<float>::AddMistery body?

    return 0;
};

So, finally, here is the question: There's a way to split a template class between the header and cpp file, moving the body of all non type-dependant methods to the cpp instead of keeping all the methods body into the header file?.

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The template can go inside a .cpp file if it is only ever used within that one .cpp file, otherwise it will need to be in a header. –  Paul R Aug 31 '12 at 11:00
    
I know, the template must be placed into the same compiling unit, but this is not the question ;) –  PaperBirdMaster Aug 31 '12 at 11:01
1  
OK - I guess I don't understand the question then - perhaps you can clarify it ? –  Paul R Aug 31 '12 at 11:02
    
@PaulR I'll try it! –  PaperBirdMaster Aug 31 '12 at 11:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The short answer is no, because a class template is not a class unless you are instantiating it with a certain template parameter(s). So there is no Foo::AddMystery() to implement.

Think of it this way: member function have knowledge of the dependent type, because they have an implicit first parameter, which is a pointer to an object of their class. So

Foo<int> f;
f.AddMistery();

is equivalent to

Foo<int> f;
Foo<int>::AddMistery(&f);

If you have instantiations of the template for certain types, then you could implement, say, Foo<int>::AddMistery in a .cpp file, but this has nothing to do with the function not requiring the template argument in its body.

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It's not possible unless you intend that your template will be used only with limited well-known set of types, e.g. int, short and double. In this case you could use explicit instantiation and place template functions definitions in .cpp file.

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