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A real recursion with CTE?

Given a hierarchical table that references itself, such as an Employee table that has the following columns:

Table      Employee
    Column Id INT NOT NULL
    Column ParentId INT NOT NULL (references Id)
    Column Name NVARCHAR(60) NOT NULL

The following query will give me all records rooted at a given EmployeeId:

DECLARE @EmployeeId INT = <%insert EmployeeId here%>;

WITH CDE AS
(
    SELECT
        *,
        0 AS Level
    FROM
        collaboration.Employee AS E
    WHERE
        Id = @EmployeeId
    UNION ALL
    SELECT
        E.*,
        CDE.Level + 1 AS Level
    FROM
        collaboration.Employee AS E
        INNER JOIN
        CDE ON E.ParentId = CDE.Id AND E.Id <> 0
)
SELECT DISTINCT
    CDE.*
FROM
    CDE
ORDER BY
    CDE.Level

What I would like is to be able to sort by "branch" and then "level", if that makes sense. So given the following table:

1    0    John Smith
2    1    John Doe
3    1    Jane Williams
4    2    Ian Bond
5    2    James Fleming

I would like the result to look like:

1    0    John Smith
2    1    John Doe
4    2    Ian Bond
5    2    James Fleming
3    1    Jane Williams

I would like a solution that does not involve building up strings to facilitate sorting. If a solution is not possible, I would like to know why.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Mikael Eriksson, podiluska, Chris Gessler, Frank van Puffelen, j0k Sep 1 '12 at 9:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@MikaelEriksson, you are right, it sort of is the same question, but I have an additional problem, which is that while I used INT for the Id column in this example, in the real situation, UNIQUEIDENTIFIER is being used and the other example would very quickly be dealing with very large strings. I would like a solution that wouldn't require building up string values to do the sorting. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Aug 31 '12 at 11:48
2  
I'd like a Ferrari. If you have a specific solution in mind, it would be a good idea to tell us what it is at the outset, or at least edit your question to show that to anyone else willing to devote time to solving your problem –  podiluska Aug 31 '12 at 12:00

1 Answer 1

;WITH CDE AS 
( 
    SELECT 
        *, 
        0 AS Level,
        convert(nvarchar(50),id) as EPath
    FROM 
        collaboration.Employee AS E 
    WHERE 
        Id = @EmployeeId 
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT 
        E.*, 
        CDE.Level + 1 AS Level ,
        convert(nvarchar(50),Epath+'/'+CONVERT(nvarchar(5),e.id))
    FROM 
        collaboration.Employee AS E 
        INNER JOIN 
        CDE ON E.ParentId = CDE.Id AND E.Id <> 0 
) 
SELECT DISTINCT 
    CDE.* 
FROM 
    CDE 
ORDER BY 
    EPath

By the way, SQL Server 2008 has a HierarchyID data type for just this kind of thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Please see my comment above regarding the kind of solution I am looking for. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Aug 31 '12 at 11:49
    
Also, using HierarchyID is not an option at the moment. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Aug 31 '12 at 11:56
    
@UmarFarooqKhawaja Any other requirements? Apart from not using strings, and not using the right datatype, that is? –  podiluska Aug 31 '12 at 12:04
    
you do not have to be offended. There is nothing offensive about have specific requirements for a solution. I have edited the question. –  Umar Farooq Khawaja Aug 31 '12 at 12:06
3  
@UmarFarooqKhawaja - People take time out of their day to try to provide a solution for you FOR FREE I might add... When you shoot down their answer because YOU forgot specific requirements that can be quite frustrating. In the future, try to include all the requirements up front, like SQL-Server-2005, etc. And you might at least say "thank you, but I forgot to mention...". Also, did you know that a HierarchyID existed in 2008? If not you might upvote on that alone as being useful (for future reference) and add a comment. –  Chris Gessler Aug 31 '12 at 12:44

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