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How can i auto-restart the runnable jar file in Linux.

I am running jar in linux VPS in a separate screen but it stops after some time due to OUTOFMEMORYERROR Java heap space.

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Have you considered increasing the memory limit of that application using the -Xmx option? It would be better to have no crash at all… –  Didier L Aug 31 '12 at 11:42
    
cannot increase the memory at the moment, have to use alternate ways. –  Solution Aug 31 '12 at 11:49
    
You can trigger an external program when an OOME occurs. This can stop your process and start a new one. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 31 '12 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Write a simple launcher which will restart the application once it came down. Something like this:

#!/bin/sh

TEMPFILE=`mktemp`
while true ; do
  echo "`date` Starting application" >> $TEMPFILE
  java -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError="kill -9 %p" -jar application.jar
  sleep 5
done

Just to be sure that the VM comes done correcly, you might want to consider the following around your main loop:

try {
    // main loop
    businessLogic();
} catch (OutOfMemoryError E) {
    System.exit(1);
}

Edit: I've personally succesfully used the Java Service Wrapper for restarting a now and then failing apache tomcat which suffered from memory leaks after applications have been redeployed too much. You might want to take a look at it, it's pretty straight forward.

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this doesn't work, you cant reliable catch OOM for way way way too many a reason, it can pop up anywhere –  bestsss Aug 31 '12 at 11:51
    
True, it ~might~ not work but it could nevertheless. It relates to the kind of error he's experiencing. That's why I would use something like JSW, or a watchdog process that forcefully performs a kill -9, as soon as the application came down. –  tbl Aug 31 '12 at 11:55
    
usually waiting for OOM is a bad idea b/c the application may lose (or corrupt) data. It's way better to try and politely shut it down when some memory threshold is reached, morealso java sucks when there is little free memory and the young gen becomes too small, for it constantly triggers full GC cycles. –  bestsss Aug 31 '12 at 12:01
    
@bestsss: When dealing with applications from third parties, keeping track of these kind of issues is pretty hard. Some sort of memory treshold vm option that could be triggered before the acutal OOM occurs would be very nice, but I don't have seen such a thing in any of today's JREs yet. –  tbl Aug 31 '12 at 12:14
    
but I don't have seen such a thing in any of today's JREs yet it's trivial code less than 150 lines or so. –  bestsss Aug 31 '12 at 12:35

try this: -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError="<cmd args>; <cmd args>" Write a shell script to "kill -TERM pid" and then start it again and put the script into cmd part of the command line option. More or less that's it but you will need to know the pid of the processes (or rely on killall or ps, etc)

Also you can use monit to periodically check if the application is running. More or less those are standard solutions. I, myself, use monitoring daemon to notify via email/sms when memory is low so a proper examination can be taken and if there is a leak to be fixed. Bluntly dumping the heap sucks when you have dozens of GB of it.

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Have you tried to by allocating more memory to jvm ? If still problem persist then You can aasociate shutdown hook but there is no gaurantee it will execute always. You can invoke other process from it which will star your program again after some delay

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1  
shutdown hook is absolutely useless. It won't be triggered and there won't be even enough memory to stat a new thread. The idea is plain bad. –  bestsss Aug 31 '12 at 12:03

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