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So, I have four integers and I need to find out the lowest two out of those four. What would be the most efficient way of doing so in C (or any other language)?

Edit: I need a fixed implementation, for the sake of efficiency as this is a very critical operation that is going to be performed thousands of times.

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Not sure about this, so I won't post it as an answer, but a "brute force" method of scanning the list for the lowest value twice, eliminating the element selected in the first pass on the second pass, would guarantee no more than 5 comparisons... –  David W Aug 31 '12 at 11:55
    
I think stackoverflow.com/a/12215020/705048 will be hard to beat for efficiency. But if you use it, make sure you comment it thoroughly for the sake of your colleagues! –  Hbcdev Aug 31 '12 at 12:07
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7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's an efficient implementation using sorting networks:

inline void Sort2(int *p0, int *p1)
{
    if (*p0 > *p1)
    {
        const int temp = *p0;
        *p0 = *p1;
        *p1 = temp;
    }
}

inline void Sort4(int *p0, int *p1, int *p2, int *p3)
{
    Sort2(p0, p1);
    Sort2(p2, p3);
    Sort2(p0, p2);  
    Sort2(p1, p3);  
    Sort2(p1, p2);  
}

This takes only 5 compares and up to 5 swaps. You can just ignore the results for p2, p3.

Note that for a performance-critical application Sort2 can be implemented without branches in one or two instructions on some architectures.

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2  
This is wonderful, thank you. –  Kristina Brooks Aug 31 '12 at 11:57
    
Note that my answer is as efficient in the worst case and more efficient in the best case, in terms of the number of comparisons. –  Hbcdev Aug 31 '12 at 16:49
    
@Hbcdev: unfortunately your solution has a lot of branches, whereas the above solution can be implemented without branches. The number of compares and swaps may be similar, but branches are very expensive when they are mispredicted. –  Paul R Aug 31 '12 at 18:38
    
@PaulR Ah, OK. Can you explain why the branches in my answer are more of a problem than yours? Does X86 have a 'min' instruction? Or is it that my branches are nested so the problem is worse? –  Hbcdev Sep 3 '12 at 7:37
    
@Hbcdev: OK - as noted in my answer above, the compare and swap operation in Sort2 can be implemented as a short branchless instruction sequence in many architectures (including x86) - this results in a completely branch-free implementation. As you probably are aware, branch misprediction can be very costly in superscalar CPUs. –  Paul R Sep 3 '12 at 10:07
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I would make an array out of them, sort and take the first two values.

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or the last two depending on how you sorted ;-) –  Lee Taylor Aug 31 '12 at 11:51
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I think you can sort the array and pick the first two elements.

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Just write a loop and keep track of the lowes 2 values ? Should be at max O(2N) which is i think the best achievable complexity.

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no, another answer here makes only 3 comparisons in 25% of cases or so. –  Will Ness Sep 7 '12 at 7:27
    
yes, yes, writing all needed comparisons under each other is indeed much faster –  Minion91 Sep 7 '12 at 7:37
    
it's not about how to write them, but finding a specific order of comparisons. –  Will Ness Sep 7 '12 at 7:47
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The most efficient way? Trying to avoid any extra steps, I got this (in pseudo-code). This will avoid any unnecessary comparisons that you'll get with other more general solutions (specifically ones that don't advantage of the transitive nature of comparison operations).

Bear in mind that this is only thinking about efficiency, not at all aiming for beautiful code.

if a<=b:
  if b<=c:
    # c too big, which of b and d is smaller?
    if b<=d:
      return (a,b)
    else:
      return (a,d)
  else if b<=d:
    # a and c both < b, and b < d
    return (a,c)
  else:
    # b is > a, c and d. Down to just those three.
    if a<=c:
      if c<=d:
        # a < c < d
        return (a,c)
      else:
        # a and d both < c
        return (a,d)
    else if d<=a:
      # Both c and d < a
      return (c,d)
    else:
      # c < a < d
      return (a,c)
else:
  # b < a
  if a<=c:
    # c too big, which of a and d is smaller?
    if a<=d:
      return (a,b)
    else:
      return (b,d)
  else if a<=d:
    # b and c both < a, and a < d
    return (b,c)
  else:
    # a is > b, c and d. Down to just those three.
    if b<=c:
      if c<=d:
        # b < c < d
        return (b,c)
      else:
        # b and d both < c
        return (b,d)
    else if d<=b:
      # Both c and d < b
      return (c,d)
    else:
      # c < b < d
      return (b,c)

I think this has a worst case of 5 comparisons and a best case of 3 (obviously there's no way of doing it in less than 3 comparison).

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You can get away with exactly 4 comparisons and maximally 4 swaps.

inline void swap(int* i, int* j) {
  static int buffer;
  buffer = *j;
  *j = *i;
  *i = buffer;
}

inline void sort2(int* a, int* s) {
  if (*s < a[1])
    swap(s,a+1);
  if (*s < a[0]) // it is NOT sufficient to say "else if" here
    swap(s,a);
}

inline void sort4(int* a) {
  sort2(a,a+2);
  sort2(a,a+3);
}

The result will be sitting the the first to cells, but note that these cells are not necessarily sorted! They're just the smallest elements.

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this is not optimal. another answer here makes only 3 comparisons in 25% of cases or so. –  Will Ness Sep 7 '12 at 7:23
    
@WillNess: Thanks. Fixed. –  bitmask Sep 7 '12 at 13:32
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You can accomplish it with at most 4 comparisons:

  • compare the first pair of numbers and let the smaller be a1 and the larger be a2
  • compare the second pair of numbers and let the smaller be a3 and the larger be a4
  • if a1 >= a4 return (a3, a4)
  • (now we know that that a1 < a4)
  • if a3 >= a2 return (a1, a2)
  • (now we also know that a3 < a2)
  • return (a1, a3)

To see that this is true, you can check all the combinations of possible returns:

(a1, a2) (a1, a3) (a1, a4)

(a2, a3) (a2, a4)

(a3, a4)

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