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Default case in a switch condition

I can compile this code without encountering any errors. I think there should be an error because of the assadfsd in the switch statement.

Why doesn't compilation fail?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int choice =0;
    scanf("%d",&choice);

    switch(choice)
    {
        case 1 :
            printf("Case 1\n");
            break;                           
        assadfsd :
           printf("Error\n");                                 
    }  

    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by Graham Borland, Andrew, Pops, Jason Robinson, Monolo Aug 31 '12 at 19:34

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2  
And where do you expect the error? I'd agree with your compiler. –  Tom Tanner Aug 31 '12 at 12:21
    
Now assadfsd : is after one case statement –  Anshul garg Aug 31 '12 at 12:24
    
If you put warning levels high, -Wall or something like that, the compiler should have told you: (1) unused label assadfsd and (2) unreachable statement printf("Error\n") –  Jens Gustedt Aug 31 '12 at 12:27
    
The compiler might warn about unreachable code, but that's perfectly legal. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 31 '12 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

It is called label

e.g

 start:
     /*statements*/
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So i can write any string before : compile won't treat it as error becuase it will treat it as label only –  Anshul garg Aug 31 '12 at 12:22
    
@Anshulgarg - Any string must be valid identifier and a label name must be unique within the function in which it appears. –  AVD Aug 31 '12 at 12:24
    
#include <stdio.h> int main(void) { int choice =0; scanf("%d",&choice); switch(choice) { case 1 : printf("Case 1\n"); break; assadfsd : int a=2; printf("Error\n"); dsefault: printf("Default"); } return 0; } –  Anshul garg Aug 31 '12 at 12:26
    
Now in this case i defined int a inside label which is against of c as in c all variables must be declared at function start –  Anshul garg Aug 31 '12 at 12:26
    
@Anshulgarg said "in c all variables must be declared at function start" No, you can do it on almost everwhere –  Daniel Hermosel Aug 31 '12 at 12:58

The syntax of the switch statement is :

switch ( expression ) statement

So you can put whatever statements you want instead of "statement". Here you used a label, and it's allowed by the C standard. So your compiler should compile the code without error.

For example, you can use this label using goto statement.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int choice = 1;
    goto assadfsd;

    switch (choice) {
    case 1:
        printf("Case 1\n");
        break;
    assadfsd:
        printf("Error\n");
    }

    return 0;
}
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Please note that this is very bad practice and not something that should be used in real applications. It is banned in MISRA-C, for example. –  Lundin Aug 31 '12 at 12:37
    
It depends on the situation. Once I've used statements different from case in a switch to implement a state machine. But I agree partly, because the example shown in this message is a very bad style. –  md5 Aug 31 '12 at 12:42
    
Don't tell that to anyone who works on the Linux kernel. The code is littered with label/gotos. It's common practice. –  Mike Aug 31 '12 at 12:51
    
@Mike The Linux kernel coding standard is quite crappy, non-scientific and unprofessional in general, so it doesn't surprise me. –  Lundin Aug 31 '12 at 13:03

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