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Given the following code:

for (id object in anArray){
    if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
       ClassOne *myObj = [[ClassOne alloc] init];
    }else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
       ClassTwo *myObj = [[ClassTwo alloc] init];
    }
    myObj.property = TRUE;
}

the compiler will raise an error regarding myObj (undeclared identifier), which is somehow obvious ("what should I do if both conditions will be false?"). That means I have to define the object before the if-else block, but which type of object I have to use? If I use id there will be errors on myObj.property = TRUE;, if I use ClassOne or ClassTwo there will be some warnings regarding incompatible pointer assignment. Should I use some other way instead of the given code?

Thank you.

(note: the snippet was written without using syntax checking or testing it, so it may contains errors)

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1  
(note: the snippet was written without using syntax checking or testing it, so it may contains errors) <-- not really great – deleted_user Aug 31 '12 at 12:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about a protocol?

@protocol MyProtocol

@property (assign, nonatomic) BOOL myProperty;

@end

Then:

for (id anObject in anArray){
    if ([anObject conformsToProtocol:@protocol(MyProtocol)]) {
        Class clazz = [anObject class];
        id<MyProtocol>  myObject = [[clazz alloc] init];
        myObject.myProperty = YES;
    }
}

This is the cleanest and shortest solution I can think of. You won't need to cast, instead you will harness the power of objective-c's dynamic binding. You won't have to add too many if-else statements. Instead you just make sure the object that comes in, conforms to your protocol.

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1  
Nice one. I knew some theory about protocols, but never used them. Your answer helped me to solve my problem and also learning more about protocols. Thanks! – ov1d1u Aug 31 '12 at 13:06
    
No problem! Cocoa relies heavily on protocols. They are fundamental in the Model-View-Controller pattern. – pedro.m. Aug 31 '12 at 13:11
    
Thats the exact same code using conforms to protocol instead of isKindOfClass - not an answer to the actual question - the solution was to put the property assignment inside the if statement block. – deleted_user Sep 1 '12 at 3:18
    
It's hardly the same code. Just because it solves the same problematic, doesn't make it the same. Also, it does answer the question: "Should I use some other way instead of the given code?". I put a comment in your answer that explains why it's not the best solution. – pedro.m. Sep 1 '12 at 16:40

You can use id to init your classes and cast them later to the correct custom class before setting the .property = TRUE

for (id object in anArray){
    id myObj;
    if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
        myObj = [[ClassOne alloc] init];
    }else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
        myObj = [[ClassTwo alloc] init];
    }

    if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
        ((ClassOne *)myObj).property = TRUE;
    }else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
        ((ClassTwo *)myObj).property = FALSE; // or whatever
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As scope of myObj limit to if block so use in if block only. Now if myObj defined outside of if block then object can't have same name.

for (id object in anArray){
 if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
   ClassOne *myObj = [[ClassOne alloc] init];
   myObj.property = TRUE;
 }else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
   ClassTwo *myObj = [[ClassTwo alloc] init];
   myObj.property = TRUE;
 }
}
share|improve this answer

It depends on the situation. For example why do you need myObj outside the if-else statement? If you need to pass it to another method you can create a base class, for ex ClassBase and make ClassOne and ClassTwo to inherit from ClassBase and then make your method accept ClassBase as an argument (that's of course if both objects have something in common). If that's not the case, what's the problem to do your logic in every statement:

if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
       ClassOne *myObj = [[ClassOne alloc] init];
       myObj.property = YES;
       [self doSomethingWith:myObj];
 }else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
       ClassTwo *myObj = [[ClassTwo alloc] init];
       myObj.otherProperty = YES;
       [self doSomethingElseWith:myObj];
    }
//end of method
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"For example why do you need myObj outside the if-else statement?" - becaus the if-else statements is followed by a large section of code, and I'm trying to avoid duplicate code as much as possible – ov1d1u Aug 31 '12 at 13:05
for (id object in anArray){
    if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassOne class]]){
        ClassOne *myObj = [[ClassOne alloc] init];
        myObj.property = TRUE;
    }
    else if ([object isKindOfClass:[ClassTwo class]]){
        ClassTwo *myObj = [[ClassTwo alloc] init];
        myObj.property = TRUE;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a poor solution. You are duplicating code and introducing unnecessary coupling. Even if it seems that it's not a big deal to write "myObj.property = YES;" twice, think what would happen if more than on properties were getting set. Now think what would happen if you have 100 different classes instead of 2. See the problem? – pedro.m. Sep 1 '12 at 16:42
    
The question wasnt how to write good code, it was why he was getting compiler errors – deleted_user Sep 1 '12 at 22:12
    
Again you fail to see the point. If you read carefully, he does know why he is getting the compiler error. He is wondering what's the best way to solve his dilemma. – pedro.m. Sep 1 '12 at 22:19
    
UHUH tats why he asked that specific question – deleted_user Sep 2 '12 at 12:07

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