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Can you refactor this ?

private void ClearUserDataFields()
{
   var textBoxes = this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>();
   foreach (var txtBoxControl in textBoxes)
   {
       txtBoxControl.Text = String.Empty;
   }
}

Isn't there anyway to do this in one LOC ?

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1  
refactor it how? –  beggs Aug 3 '09 at 10:14
    
Minimum LOC's. I don't know ...more powerful use of linq and lambda expressions. –  Dumb Questioner Aug 3 '09 at 10:16
4  
Minimum LOC is an aweful metric. It reduces maintainability. The cost of code is equal to the cost to develop it + the cost to maintain it. If you follow your current line of thinking you don't actually decrease the cost to develop, but you sure as hell increase the cost of maintenance. –  DarkwingDuck Aug 3 '09 at 10:37

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Ok because its SO important to see this in one line of code, here's your answer and it doesn't use a ToList():

foreach (var tb in Controls.OfType<TextBox>()) tb.Text = String.Empty;
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Just made me win a bet. (argue regarding readability and maintainability) –  Dumb Questioner Aug 3 '09 at 10:52
    
Hope your all happy now :) +1 –  Mark Dickinson Aug 3 '09 at 10:54
    
+1 best solution :) –  Hannoun Yassir Aug 3 '09 at 10:54
    
I thought you snapped for a moment there :)) –  Dumb Questioner Aug 3 '09 at 10:56
    
Sorry if I seemed rude. I'm not sure what the etiquette is for balancing questions that promote bad dev, versus just answering the question. I prefer the former (obviously). :) –  DarkwingDuck Aug 6 '09 at 11:25

it looks nice to me, there are no duplications, no code smells (like typeof), etc

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Sure. I'd spell 'Fields' correctly. :)

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Fixed :) –  Dumb Questioner Aug 3 '09 at 10:17
this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>().ToList().ForEach(
   delegate(TextBox t){ t.Text = String.Empty;}
   );

Why on Earth though?

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Why? See: stackoverflow.com/questions/1221527/… –  beggs Aug 3 '09 at 10:23
2  
What I meant was why do people think that minimum loc is good. It's just some damned guerilla tactic that average developers use to make themselves indispensible. Usually this is accompanied by the same people complaining that their phone always rings on their days off. –  Mark Dickinson Aug 3 '09 at 10:28
    
And as I posted above, ToList() creates a new list in memory and therefore is a waste of time and resources. A standard foreach is fine. –  DarkwingDuck Aug 3 '09 at 10:33
    
IEnumerable<T>.ForEach doesn't exist. That's why the ToList method is used. Yes a foreach loop would be better, to read and to run, I think we know :) –  Mark Dickinson Aug 3 '09 at 10:36
    
@DarkwingDuck : you have a better idea ?(at least for a lambda expression) –  Hannoun Yassir Aug 3 '09 at 10:38
private void ClearUserDataFileds()
{
   foreach (var txtBoxControl in this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>())
   {
       txtBoxControl.Text = String.Empty;
   }
}

or

// think it's slower then previous one because of ToList call
private void ClearUserDataFileds()
{
   this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>().ToList().ForEach(tb => tb.Text = String.Empty);
}
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However, I'm not sure if I'd even consider the latter in any way better than the original code due to readability issues - the original or the first example given here are far more readable (at least to me) than a lambda expression. –  Amber Aug 3 '09 at 10:28
    
Agree, but the second example is still an option. –  Kamarey Aug 3 '09 at 10:33
foreach (var control in Controls.OfType<TextBox>()) 
    control.Text = String.Empty;

ToList/lambda/ForEach are really redundant here and especially because this code have strong side effects so no point expressing imperative loop with side effect via a functional call.

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You could rename it to ClearUserDataFields to fix what is likely to be a typo in the name. Other than that, it looks fine to me.

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Well the "this" qualifier is redundant :) you can remove it

and since you have a tag lambda-expressions here you go

private void ClearUserDataFields()
    {
        Controls.OfType<TextBox>().ToList().ForEach(txtBoxControl => txtBoxControl.Text = string.Empty);
    }
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Converting to a list is an unncessary waste of time and resources. The existing enumerator is fine. –  DarkwingDuck Aug 3 '09 at 10:28
1  
@DarkwingDuck - IEnumerable doesn't give you a public ForEach method, which would hamper this worthy excercise ;-) –  Mark Dickinson Aug 3 '09 at 10:34
2  
Sure, LEAVE IT AS IS. Why the hell would you convert it to a List? Why don't you convert it to a dictionary while your at it, and make all the Key's random numbers. Or perhaps serialise it to XML and query it with Linq to XML? Why wouldn't you do that? Because its a dumb idea. –  DarkwingDuck Aug 3 '09 at 10:39
1  
@Yassir - assuming that there was a lot of this code compression going on in a solution. There could well be a lot of local, and private class level variables. Some people like to use undescores to differentiate these, but some people also like to use notepad to do their development. I would say that whilst the this keyword is not required, it is far from redundant. –  Mark Dickinson Aug 3 '09 at 10:49
1  
The "this" qualifier is in no way redundant. It makes it absolutely clear that you're accessing an instance member. Yes, it's five more characters, but it's a compiler-checked aid to readability. –  Greg Beech Aug 3 '09 at 10:49

Oh, BTW, I love using MVVM so if this was a smart client app, I'd remove the coupling between the clearing logic and the actual controls. Instead you would be clearing your VM properties, which would be bound to the controls.

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