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In the code below, jquery selector $(":button") is able to select the (+) button.

However, when I create new buttons according to selected value of the dropdown menu. The same selector is not able to select the new (-) buttons.

The code is attached :

 <script>
$(document).ready(function () {
$(":button").click(function () {
        alert("here");
        })
});

</script>

<select id="thing" name="garden" >
<option id="u" selected="selected" ></option>
<option id="1" > Flowers </option>
<option id="2" > Shrubs </option>
<option id="3" > Trees </option>
<option id="4" > Bushes </option>
<option id="5" > Grass</option>
<option id="6" > Dirt</option>

</select>

<button> + </button>

<div id="area"></div>

<button> + </button>
<script>
$("#thing").change(function () {
      var str = "";
      var id="";
      var num=1;
      $("#thing option:selected").each(function () {
            str += $(this).text() + " ";
            id = $(this).attr('id');
    $("#"+id).attr('disabled',"disabled");
          });
      if (id != "u") {
          var tx=$("#area").html();
          var button="<button>-</button>";
          $("#area").html(tx+"<div>"+str+" "+button+"</div>");
      };
    }).trigger('change');
</script>
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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$(document).on('click', 'button', function () {
    alert("here");
});

This is a delegated event handler, which means that it can work on dynamically added elements. From the jQuery documentation for the on method:

Delegated events have the advantage that they can process events from descendant elements that are added to the document at a later time. By picking an element that is guaranteed to be present at the time the delegated event handler is attached, you can use delegated events to avoid the need to frequently attach and remove event handlers. This element could be the container element of a view in a Model-View-Controller design, for example, or document if the event handler wants to monitor all bubbling events in the document. The document element is available in the head of the document before loading any other HTML, so it is safe to attach events there without waiting for the document to be ready.

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@undefined - You're right, edited it, I'm used to inputs, did'nt realize anyone was using button elements anymore ! –  adeneo Aug 31 '12 at 13:18

For dynamicallay generated elements events should be delegated, you can use on method.

$(document).on('click', 'button', function() {
        alert("here");
});

Also note that :button selector is deprecated.

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try this :

$("#thing").on("click","button",function () {
   alert("here");
})
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try on instead of click

$(":button").on("click",function () {
        alert("here");
})

Jquery Docs

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you just need to bind the click event for button after adding the new element. ie after code of creating new button,just write this function once more

 $(":button").click(function () {
    alert("here");
    })
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The reason is, because your click function only binds the click event listener to elements that are existing directly after the document is ready. If you want to have the event listening also to dynamically created elements, then use the .on() function. The documentation of this function is here.

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$(":button").bind("click", function () { alert("here"); });

just use bind, easier..

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