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I have such relation:

class TaskSet
{
    /**
     * @var integer $id
     *
     * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer")
     * @ORM\Id
     * @ORM\GeneratedValue(strategy="AUTO")
     */
    private $id;


    /**
     * @var \Doctrine\Common\Collections\ArrayCollection $tasks
     *
     * @ORM\OneToMany (targetEntity="Task", mappedBy="taskset", cascade={"ALL"})
     */
    private $tasks;

and

class Task
{
    /**
     * @var integer $id
     *
     * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer")
     * @ORM\Id
     * @ORM\GeneratedValue(strategy="AUTO")
     */
    private $id;

    /**
     * @var TaskSet $taskset
     *
     * @ORM\ManyToOne(targetEntity="TaskSet", inversedBy="tasks")
     */
    private $taskset;

generated SQL looks like:

CREATE TABLE task (
    id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, 
    taskset_id INT DEFAULT NULL, 
    INDEX IDX_527EDB255D67FAA4 (taskset_id), PRIMARY KEY(id)
) DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci ENGINE = InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE task_set (
    id INT AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL, 
    PRIMARY KEY(id)
) DEFAULT CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci ENGINE = InnoDB;   

ALTER TABLE task ADD CONSTRAINT FK_527EDB255D67FAA4 FOREIGN KEY (taskset_id) REFERENCES task_set (id)

Since now everything is well, I get one(testset) to many(test) bidirectional relation.

Unfortunately Doctrine2 chooses Task entity as owning side so this code is not persisting relation between entities:

$em = $this->getDoctrine()->getEntityManager();

$taskset = new TaskSet();
$taskset->setName('task 1');
$taskset->setDescription('desc 1');

$task =  new Task();
$task->setName('task 1');
$task->setClassName('class name 1');
$taskset->addTask($task);

$em->persist($taskset);
$em->flush();

output from code above is:

INSERT INTO `task_set` (`id`, `name`, `description`) VALUES (1, 'task 1', 'desc 1');
INSERT INTO `task` (`id`, `taskset_id`, `name`, `className`) VALUES (1, NULL, 'task 1', 'class name 1');

So finally questions:

  1. Is there a way to change owning side (of course I cannot revert relation)?
  2. How mark taskset_id as NOT NULL?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. In class TaskSet, edit the addTask($task) function and add at the end:

    $task->setTaskset($this);

  2. As Carlos said in comment, my initial post doesn't really answer the issue. You must use the nullable property on the JoinColumn definition:

    class Task { /** * @var integer $id * * @ORM\Column(name="id", type="integer") * @ORM\Id * @ORM\GeneratedValue(strategy="AUTO") */ private $id;

    /**
     * @var TaskSet $taskset
     * 
     * @ORM\JoinColumn(nullable=false)
     * @ORM\ManyToOne(targetEntity="TaskSet", inversedBy="tasks")
     */
    private $taskset;
    

Initial answer:

  1. Use a Validator, in your case the NotNull validator, on the $taskset property of your Task class.

Example from Symfony2's documentation:

// src/Acme/BlogBundle/Entity/Author.php
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraints as Assert;

class Author
{
    /**
     * @Assert\NotNull()
     */
    protected $firstName;
}
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2  
For the second answer, this will not mark the field as not null, but will validate that this is not null if you run the validator (for example if you use this in a form and call the isValid() function). But if you create the entity some other way it can still be null –  Carlos Granados Aug 31 '12 at 13:37

For 1

Add

$task->setTaskSet($taskset);

It will not change the owning side but the relation will be saved

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