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I have a class defined like this:

#include <cassert>

class Vector
{
     double v[2];

     double operator()(int i) const
     {
         assert(i>=0 && i<2);
         return this->v[i];
     }
};

when running the VS2010 code analysis tool, a warning is thrown on array access:

warning C6385: Invalid data: accessing 'this->v', the readable size is '16' bytes, but '-16' bytes might be read

but it seems perfectly valid to me, as the assert should prevent any negative value. What is happening?


Edit: it seems that code analysis does not correctly handle asserts:

assert(i<2)

generates

warning C6385: Invalid data: accessing 'this->v', the readable size is '16' bytes, but '24' bytes might be read

while

assert(i>=0)

generates

warning C6385: Invalid data: accessing 'this->v', the readable size is '16' bytes, but '-16' bytes might be read

Replacing the asserts with ifs removes the problem.

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What happens if instead of assert you have an if-statement? –  Dan Aug 31 '12 at 14:10
    
Dan: it works correctly. Could this mean that the tool is just mishandling the assert()? –  Coffee on Mars Aug 31 '12 at 14:53
    
If you are interested in static analysis tools at the same time try to PVS-Studio. –  Andrey Cpp Aug 31 '12 at 16:14
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is quite an old one, but I wanted to post my findings on it:

Replacing the int with a size_t fixes it because an int can be < 0, and so you rightfully get the analysis error.

To fix it either change it to size_t, or unsigned int.

Static analysis does not take asserts into account, which is why the if works, but assert doesn't. if you want to surpress the warning you can add:

_analysis_assume(i>0 && i < MY_MAX_VALUE)

This will tell the analyzer which values to expect for i.

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The analyzer probably isn't taking the assert into account when it looks at the return this->v[i];.

To fix it, use types instead of asserts to enforce a positive index:

class Vector { 
    double v[2];
public:
    double operator()(size_t i) const { 
        assert(i<2);
        return v[i];
    }
};

As an aside, using this->whatever (except when truly necessary, which is rare and only in templates anyway) makes you look clueless.

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Even changing to size_t, the assert seems not to be considered correctly: see my expanded question for the case of assert(i<2). –  Coffee on Mars Aug 31 '12 at 14:52
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