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Part of the task I have is to create a class, which contains two lists of two other classes and create "The big 4"(constructor, copy constructor, operator=, destructor)

Here's what I did:

using namespace std;

class A{...};
class B{...};

class C{
  list<A> a;
  list<B> b;
  public:
    C();
    ~C();
    C(const C& c);
    void operator=(const C& c);
};

C::C(){
  //How to allocate memory for a and b?
}

C::~C(){
  //How to free the memory?
}

C::C(const C& c){
  a=c.a;
  b=c.b;
}

void operator=(const C& c){
  if(&c==this) return;
  // how do I delete a and b?
  a=c.a;
  b=c.b;
}

Could you clear out the things that I don't understand(as comments in the code). And also give advice if I haven't done anything correctly?

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What is this list, std::list? –  Kiril Kirov Aug 31 '12 at 14:09
    
nope, it's not homework, edited the post - yes std::list. –  Ivan Prodanov Aug 31 '12 at 14:09
    
Could you elaborate on what you mean by: contains two lists of two other classes? Is this in fact two lists of instances of two other classes? And does each list need to contain objects of both of the other classes or just be a container of one type of object? –  marko Aug 31 '12 at 14:13
    
one list contains instances of one class, the other list contains instanced of another class. . . –  Ivan Prodanov Aug 31 '12 at 14:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you're using values (std::list values), there is nothing to do. Your constructor will call the std::list constructors automatically, which allocate any resources needed. Your destructor will call the std::list destructor, which frees resources which it acquired.

You would need some extra work if you either hold pointers to lists (i.e. std::list<A> *a;) or lists of pointers (std::list<A*> a;') - or both (std::list<A*> *a;).

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1. But there are instances of a class in those lists - the list will free them automatically? 2. What about the operator=? Nothing to add? 3. So constructor and destructor of C should stay empty? –  Ivan Prodanov Aug 31 '12 at 14:13
    
@John: re 1.: Yes, the std::list will invoke the A destructors automatically. re 2/3: You don't need either of the four: no constructor, no destructor, no copy constructor and no assignment operator. The default implementations of those functions will do just the right thing in your case. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 31 '12 at 14:16
    
@John: You don't need operator=. A default one will be generated for you that does the right thing. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 31 '12 at 14:16
    
If storing pointers to A and B - e.g. objects created externally to your class - you can again eliminate the need for the big 4 by using smart-pointers e.g. std::list<std::shared_prt<A> > –  marko Aug 31 '12 at 14:17
    
and depending on how you intend to search/add to/delete from your containers. std::vector may be a better choice than std::list –  marko Aug 31 '12 at 14:19

//How to allocate memory for a and b?

You don't need to allocate memory by yourself. because you are allocating your member variables on stack. which is automatically set up when someone instanciate's your class.

//How to free the memory?

You don't need to free memory by yourself. for the same reason. your stack variables will be automatically deallocated when scop ends.

// how do I delete a and b?

Why do you need to delete a and b ? you are copying the data from other object to this.

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It has nothing to do with being "on the stack" or not. An object of type C can be declared in static scope or created with operator new. –  Jive Dadson Aug 31 '12 at 17:32

if you use std::list, your class A or B should: 1 can be allocate on stack and heap 2 can not be a singleton object.

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where comes singleton here ? –  Neel Basu Aug 31 '12 at 19:04
    
A object that's in a std::list, should support copy(clone) safely. If we put a singleton object input a std::list, it's a mistake. –  feelapi Sep 4 '12 at 14:51

Your variables are using the auto storage class they do not need to be explicitly deleted.

Your assignment operator

void operator=(const& C rhs);

shouldn't return void. // as this is not what the built in types do and prevents assignment chaining.

e.g.

int x, y, z;
x = y = z = 0;

It looks like your trying to implement move semantics with your comment

// how do I delete a and b?

your assignment operator should copy the state or you should document that it uses non-standard behavior. e.g. move semantics, boost::noncopyable Et cetera.

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With the advent of the move-constructor, it is now the Big Six. Study and understand all the ins and outs here, and you will have a masters degree in class boiler plates.

#include <list>

class A {};
class B {};

class C{
  std::list<A> a;
  std::list<B> b;
  public:
    typedef std::list<A>::size_type size_type;
    explicit C(size_type sz =0);
    virtual ~C();
    C(const C& c);

    // Specialize external swap. Necessary for assignment operator below,
    // and for ADL (argument-dependant lookup).
    friend void swap(C& first, C& second); 

    // Assignment-operator. Note that the argument "other" is passed by value.
    // This is the copy-and-swap idiom (best practice).
    C& operator=(C other);  // NOTE WELL. Passed by value

    // move-constructor - construct-and-swap idiom (best practice)
    C(C&& other);

};

C::C(size_type sz) : a(sz), b(sz) {}

C::~C(){}

C::C(const C& c) :a(c.a), b(c.b){}

void swap(C& first, C& second) {
        // enable ADL (best practice)
        using std::swap; 
        swap(first.a, second.a);
        swap(first.b, second.b);
}

// Assignment-operator. Note that the argument "other" is passed by value.
// This is the copy-and-swap idiom (best practice).
C& C::operator=(C other) {
    swap(*this, other); // Uses specialized swap above.
    return *this;
} 

// move-constructor - construct-and-swap idiom (best practice)
C::C(C&& other): a(0) , b(0) {
    swap(*this, other);
}
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