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Possibly a redundant and useless question, but my colleagues and I refer to <% %> as server tags, but is there an actual name for them?

one i've seen used is calling them Alcohol tags.

Edited based on answers

We're referring to them in ASP.NET, but I would've thought they'd use the same name across all languages if they did the same job?

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What language are we talking about? –  karim79 Aug 3 '09 at 10:58
    
No reason they'd use the same name across languages. Think of 'fields' vs 'instance variables' –  MPritch Aug 3 '09 at 11:25
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Server-Side Scripting Delimiters", as laid out in this question/answer here:

ASP.NET "special" tags

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In JSP they are called scriptlets, don't know if you were talking about Java though.

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"scriptlets", actually, but I assume that was a typo –  skaffman Aug 3 '09 at 11:00
    
Yes typo... ^^ In every day life I use to call them scriplets, so I transferred the error here, thanks for pointing out. –  Alberto Zaccagni Aug 3 '09 at 11:04
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In ASP, they're "Embedded Code Blocks".

I like to try and not use "tags" except when referring to to HTML or XML tags (the ones that have a start and end)

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Brad is correct: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178135.aspx –  Johan Leino Aug 3 '09 at 11:43
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As far as I know, they were called "Server Tags" in classical ASP

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I've heard them referred to as bee stings. In Ruby/ERB, they're known as "Embedded Ruby".

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That's what I use for them, but I've also heard people use the term inline tags.

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