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I have a class with number of methods and want to have one exception handler for them all. There are so many of these methods and they have different parameters, that it would be ugly to write try/catch for each of them.

Do you maybe know a way where I can do it with having a one in class exception handler, which will handle them all.

UPDATE:


Many of you ask me why. The reason is that I am calling a data source with various methods. so my class has functions getData1, gedData2, getData3,getData4, ...., getDataN. The problem is that there is no way to check if the connection is still open and creating new connection is very very expensive. So I am trying to reuse connection and if the connection on the next call has failed, i would catch this and reconnect and try again. That is why i need this try/catch all block.

to do this for all the functions:

try{    
   datasource.getData()
}
catch(ConnectionException)
{
   datasource.Connect();
   datasource.getData()
}


Thanks

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I know it is an old question but I wanted to say that although I mostly agree with the replies below that were submitted on the day the question was asked, there are times when this ability would be very useful. husayt described one above and I found this question because I have another scenario. Even though Jack Allan's answer does not work for my scenario, I upvoted it because it is useful in other situations and it is very clever, IMHO. That said, before you use Jack's "solution" make sure there is not some other way to structure your code to avoid the need for this altogether. –  Andrew Steitz Aug 24 '12 at 13:05
    
There isn't such a mechanism -- nor should there be, IMHO. It is not consistent with how control flow is passed around. It doesn't matter that what you have to do is "ugly". It doesn't matter that the solution you did, requires writing extra code. What matters is that you be able to write software that is easy to understand, and to maintain later, when you (or someone else) has forgotten the original details. If a method needs to do something when an exception happens, then there MUST be something in the method, that says what to do. This is a GOOD thing. –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 10 '13 at 22:32
    
BTW, I've upvoted the question, because I think this is a GREAT question. It is legitimate, and useful to others, to WANT to do this. Understanding WHY there isn't a way to do this, and understanding what should be done (which you already did, in your question, even though you didn't like the result), will be useful to others. –  ToolmakerSteve Jul 10 '13 at 22:36
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use a delegate to pass your method's code into a single try catch like the following example:

    private void GlobalTryCatch(Action action)
    {
        try
        {
            action.Invoke();
        }
        catch (ExpectedException1 e)
        {
            throw MyCustomException("Something bad happened", e);
        }
        catch (ExpectedException2 e)
        {
            throw MyCustomException("Something really bad happened", e);
        }
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        GlobalTryCatch(() =>
        {
            // Method code goes here
        });
    }
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I can't figure out any reason why you may benefit from handling all the exceptions in a class using a single method (can you elaborate? I'm curious...)

Anyway, you can use AOP (Aspect Oriented Programming) techniques to inject (statically or at runtime) exception handling code around the methods of your class.

There's a good assembly post-processing library called PostSharp that you can configure using attributes on the methods in your class:

You may define an aspect like this (from PostSharp website):

public class ExceptionDialogAttribute : OnExceptionAspect
{
    public override void OnException(MethodExecutionEventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        string message = eventArgs.Exception.Message;
        MessageBox.Show(message, "Exception");
        eventArgs.FlowBehavior = FlowBehavior.Continue;
    }
}

And then you'll apply the attribute to the methods you want to watch for exceptions, like this:

public class YourClass {

    // ...

    [ExceptionDialog]
    public string DoSomething(int param) {
        // ...
    }
}

You can also apply the attribute to the whole class, like this:

[ExceptionDialog]
public class YourClass {
    // ...
    public string DoSomething(int param) {
        // ...
    }
    public string DoSomethingElse(int param) {
        // ...
    }
}

This will apply the advice (the exception handling code) to every method in the class.

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This sounds like a problem with your design. Can you elaborate on exactly what exceptions you are trying to catch and why and we can try and help with that.

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yes probably I need to give more context, check my update to the question please. –  husayt Aug 3 '09 at 12:13
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I don't think there is. You could move the try/catch to the caller, but that's not very good design. It may be better to separate it out into another class, and use Reflection to call the methods, like this:

public class MyClass {}
public class MySafeClass {
    public void CallMethod(string name, object[] param) {
        Type t = typeof(MyClass);
        MyClass mc = new MyClass();
        try {
            t.GetMethod(name).Invoke(mc, param);
        }
        catch {
            //...;
        }
    }

}

But you shouldn't! It's not very good practice.

Another method is still using try/catch but having a single method to throw exceptions, etc back to the user:

public class MyClass {
    void DoException(string message) {
        throw new Exception(message);
    }
}

But that still isn't that good an option.

I don't see why it would be ugly - even if you just wrap the whole method in one try/catch with a message. That might be feasible.

It's also a better option to just leave them and pass them back up to the caller, perhaps in try/finally.

It's not exactly hard to try/catch everything, especially with the snippets in Visual Studio and SharpDevelop.

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Thanks for reply. Maybe looking into the update to the question you could see my reasons. –  husayt Aug 3 '09 at 12:19
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Exceptions are not really class related but method/callstack oriented. An object should, in general, not try to handle exceptions from it's own methods. It's up to the callers of those methods.

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you might want to put a try/catch about you main method, although i consider this to be a serious misuse of exception handling, except you want to append a logger or sth.

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i need something only for that class and handled inside that class Thnks –  husayt Aug 3 '09 at 12:05
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