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I have the following code:

...
$mysqli->autocommit(FALSE);

if(in_array('files',$item)){
            $sql_el_truncate = "
                TRUNCATE TABLE `article_files`;
                TRUNCATE TABLE `files`;
                TRUNCATE TABLE `gallery_files`;
                TRUNCATE TABLE `image_captions`;
            ";

            $mysqli->multi_query($sql_el_truncate);

            do{ 
                $mysqli->use_result(); 
            }while ($mysqli->next_result()); 


            if ($mysqli->errno) { 
                $valid_entry = 0;
            } 
            echo $valid_entry;
        }

if( $valid_entry){
            $mysqli->commit();
        }else{
            $mysqli->rollback();
        }

...

On error I get a proper $valid_entry value of 0, but the rollback is not working. Even if I write on purpose some of the TRUNCATE commands falsely it will still run the rest commands, give me the error but it won't rollback.

Anyone knows how can I properly use the transaction on the mysqli?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the MySQL Reference Manual for TRUNCATE TABLE (emphasis is mine):

Logically, TRUNCATE TABLE is similar to a DELETE statement that deletes all rows, or a sequence of DROP TABLE and CREATE TABLE statements. To achieve high performance, it bypasses the DML method of deleting data. Thus, it cannot be rolled back, it does not cause ON DELETE triggers to fire, and it cannot be performed for InnoDB tables with parent-child foreign key relationships.

If you want to be able to ROLLBACK you are going to have to use DELETE statements instead. They are less efficient here, but should give you the desired behavior.

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Thank you for your answer! Now what are you suggesting I did? Leave it as it is and still get some of the truncates run since they were to run anyway or there is an alternative method? –  Dimitris Damilos Aug 31 '12 at 15:33
    
Updated my answer. –  Sean Bright Aug 31 '12 at 15:35

It looks to me like those TRUNCATE commands cause an implicit commit:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/implicit-commit.html

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