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now I have one formula:

int a = 53, x = 53, length = 62, result;
result = (a + x) % length;

but how to calculate reverse modulus to get the smallest "x" if I known result already

(53 + x) % 62 = 44
//how to get x

i mean what's the formula or logic to get x

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1  
lots of values of x will satisfy that equation. It would be fair to say the possibilities are infinite but, not within the bounds of 55 and int.MaxValue. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 15:41
3  
@Jodrell It was stated that he's looking for the smallest x. That limits it. –  Corey Ogburn Aug 31 '12 at 15:43
    
@CoreyOgburn oops, good point. –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 15:48
    
I guess the lowest is actually -9 –  Jodrell Aug 31 '12 at 16:01
    
I suppose the smallest positive "x" ... –  digEmAll Aug 31 '12 at 16:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
private int ReverseModulus(int div, int a, int remainder)
{
   if(remainder >= div)
      throw new ArgumentException("Remainder cannot be greater than or equal to divisor");
   if(a < remainder)
      return remainder - a;
   return div + remainder - a;
}

e.g. :

// (53 + x) % 62 = 44
var res = ReverseModulus(62,53,44); // res = 53

// (2 + x) % 8 = 3
var res = ReverseModulus(8,2,3); // res = 1
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thank bro, this works perfectly –  Ivan Li Aug 31 '12 at 16:05
    
@Ivan Li: his div + remainder - a is my B + C - A. If mine doesn't work with other numbers, neither would this. –  Corey Ogburn Aug 31 '12 at 16:07
    
@CoreyOgburn: I guess OP means when a < remainder ... –  digEmAll Aug 31 '12 at 16:09
    
In that case, no answers work. I'm not trying to discredit your answer @digEmAll, I just feel a little shafted for having the same basic equation as you (12 mins before you), just without the obvious validation. –  Corey Ogburn Aug 31 '12 at 16:12
    
However, is it correct to consider the smallest positive x ? Otherwise the smallest in your example should be -9, not 53 ... –  digEmAll Aug 31 '12 at 16:12

It may not be the X that was originally used in the modulus, but if you have

(A + x) % B = C

You can do

(B + C - A) % B = x

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unfortunately this doesn't work with other numbers –  Ivan Li Aug 31 '12 at 15:58
    
Do you have an example of numbers where it won't work? –  Corey Ogburn Aug 31 '12 at 16:05
    
Nevermind, @digEmAll's answer points out where mine fails. Editted to account for that. –  Corey Ogburn Aug 31 '12 at 16:19
    
this of course is the first and good answer, but @digEmAll's straightforwardly solves my problem with if statement handling. but anyway, thanks, you guys help me a lot. –  Ivan Li Aug 31 '12 at 16:30

x = (44 - 53) % 62 should work?

x = (44 - a) % length;
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how about

IEnumerable<int> ReverseModulo(
    int numeratorPart, int divisor, int modulus)
{
   for(int i = (divisor + modulus) - numeratorPart; 
       i += divisor; 
       i <= int.MaxValue)
   {
       yield return i;
   }
}

I'm now aware this answer is flawed because it does not gice the smallest but a .First() would fix that.

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Who needs a computer? If 53 + x is congruent to 44, modulo 62, then we know that for integer k,

53 + x + 62*k = 44

Solving for x, we see that

x = 44 - 53 - 62*k = -9 - 62*k

Clearly the smallest solutions are -9 (when k=0) and 53 (when k=1).

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