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I have been learning about drawing to panels using bitmaps. I thought I would run a trial program to simply turn a white panel black. (May seem a complicated way of doing it but this is just to test the basics) My program is as follows:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private Bitmap buffer = new Bitmap(100,100);

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void panel1_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
       e.Graphics.DrawImageUnscaled(buffer, Point.Empty);
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            {
                buffer.SetPixel(i, j, Color.Black);
            }
        }
    }
}

When I run it and press the button the panel does not seem to change. Any Idea where I am going wrong. Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Aside from any other issues drawing a rectangle on the bitmap and filling it would be about 10,000 times more efficient. – Tony Hopkinson Aug 31 '12 at 17:18
    
What method can I use to do that? Is it a bitmap method or otherwise? – user1487087 Aug 31 '12 at 17:24
1  
In the paint event handler, you can use e.Graphics to draw simple shapes, so you could use FillRectangle(), for instance, to create the black rectangle. However, @TonyHopkinson, the OP specifically states he knows the Bitmap is not the simplest or most efficient way to do it; however, if the Bitmap is sourced from memory (say something being drawn on by an unmanaged graphics library) or the OP is making more complex changes to it than simply setting every pixel to black, then it's absolutely the way to do this. – KeithS Aug 31 '12 at 17:32
    
@KeithS. I can't agree at all, setpixel is the method of last resort. – Tony Hopkinson Sep 1 '12 at 22:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to invalidate the panel's client area so that Windows will force a repaint. But there are some other issues:

  1. FillRectangle will do a much more efficient job than painting each pixel in a loop, as @Tony suggested.
  2. You might hit concurrency issues if the panel is invalidated before buffer is ready to be displayed. Be sure that the bitmap generation is isolated from its presentation.

These suggestions are summarized (but not tested) as follows:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Bitmap tempBuffer = new Bitmap(100, 100);

    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(tempBuffer))
    using (SolidBrush blackBrush = new SolidBrush(Color.Black))
    {
        g.FillRectangle(blackBrush, new Rectangle(0, 0, tempBuffer.Width-1, tempBuffer.Height-1);
    }

    buffer = tempBuffer;
    panel1.Invalidate();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works. Thanks for the help! – user1487087 Aug 31 '12 at 17:52

In addition to invalidating the panel's client area, if you're wanting it to paint when you click the button you'll want to wire up the paint event in the button's click event. Give this a shot:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private bool _paintWired;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void PanelPaint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        using (Graphics g = this.panel1.CreateGraphics())
        {
            g.FillRectangle(Brushes.Black, this.panel1.Bounds);
        }
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if(!_paintWired)
        {
            this.panel1.Paint += new PaintEventHandler(PanelPaint);
            _paintWired = true;
        }

        this.panel1.Invalidate();
    }
}

UPDATE: Sorry, I missed the point about using a bitmap.

share|improve this answer
1  
No. Bad. Attach the handler in the constructor or in InitializeComponent(). Attaching it where you have done so will cause it to be attached again every time the button is clicked, causing the handler to be called multiple times (and thus the rectangle to be drawn multiple times). In a more complex example where you would expect that, or where the handler is for something that happens automatically, such as a timed event, it would quickly become untenable. – KeithS Aug 31 '12 at 17:35
    
Very true, in my haste I forgot that piece. Updated code to reflect one way to deal with that. – Jeff Aug 31 '12 at 17:50
    
That's... better? Why wouldn't you put it in either of the two places I stated? – KeithS Aug 31 '12 at 17:56
    
Because the original question states "When I run it and press the button the panel does not seem to change." He was trying to paint in response to a button click. The idea of painting a panel black in response doesn't really make much sense anyway, but that's what the question stated and what I tried to answer. I have always wired it up in the place you mentioned. – Jeff Aug 31 '12 at 18:05
    
It works, so I'll remove the downvote, but for the record, I disagree with "lazy" attaching of event handlers. If behavior is conditional on some user event, I prefer to track that the event has occurred and make the behavior conditional within a fixed handler. Your code would be simplified significantly by simply setting the boolean to true, and then using that boolean in an if statement to control painting the rectangle. – KeithS Aug 31 '12 at 18:17

try this example I use it for something like what you want to do and it worked. I hope to help you

example_1

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