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I was doing some research on IO and I read the following article which talks about buffering techniques. To minimize disk accesses and work by the underlying operating system, buffering techniques use a temporary buffer that reads data in a chunk-wise manner, instead of reading data directly from the disk with every read operation.

Examples were given without and with buffering.

without buffering:

try 
{ 
  File f = new File("Test.txt");
  FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(f);
  int b; int ctr = 0; 

  while((b = fis.read()) != -1) 
  { 
    if((char)b== '\t') 
    { 
      ctr++; 
    } 
  } 
  fs.close();
 // not the ideal way
 } catch(Exception e)
 {}

With buffering:

try
{
  File f = new File("Test.txt");
  FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(f);
  BufferedInputStream bs = new BufferedInputStream(fis);
  int b;
  int ctr = 0;
  while((b =bs.read()) != -1)
  {
    if((char)b== '\t')
    {
      ctr++;
    }
  }
  fs.close(); // not the ideal way
}
catch(Exception e){}

The conclusion was:

Test.txt was a 3.5MB  file 
Scenario 1 executed between 5200 to 5950 milliseconds for 10 test runs 
Scenario 2 executed between 40 to 62 milliseconds for 10 test runs.

Is there any other way to do this in Java that is better? Or any other method / technique to give better performance?Please advise..!

share|improve this question
1  
The code formatting ... the HORROR! No, but could you properly indent the code. Its annoying for people who would like to help you to fight to read your code. Thanks! – thatidiotguy Aug 31 '12 at 17:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is there any other way to do this in Java that is better? Or any other method / technique to give better performance?

In terms of IO performance, that probably is going to be the best without a lot of other code. You are going to be IO bound most likely anyway.

while((b =bs.read()) != -1)

This is very inefficient to read byte-by-byte. If you are reading a text file then you should be using a BufferedReader instead. This converts a byte array into String.

BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));
...
while ((String line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
   ...
}

Also, with any IO, you should always do it in a try/finally block to make sure you close it:

FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(f);
BufferedReader reader;
try {
    reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis));
    // once we wrap the fis in a reader, we just close the reader
} finally {
    if (reader != null) {
       reader.close();
    }
    if (fis != null) {
       fis.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

the problem with your code is that you're reading file by bytes (one byte per request). Read it into array chunk by chunk - and performance will be equal to one with Buffer.

you may want to try out NIO and memory-mapped files as well, see http://www.linuxtopia.org/online_books/programming_books/thinking_in_java/TIJ314_029.htm

share|improve this answer

You can read blocks of data at a time which can still be faster than using a buffered input.

FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(new File("Test.txt"));
int len, ctr = 0;
byte[] bytes = new byte[8192];

while ((len = fis.read(bytes)) > 0)
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        if (bytes[len] == '\t')
            ctr++;
fis.close();

You can also try memory mapping.

FileChannel fc = new FileInputStream(new File("Test.txt")).getChannel();
ByteBuffer bb = fc.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, fc.size());
int ctr = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < bb.limit(); i++)
    if (bb.get(i) == '\t')
        ctr++;
fc.close();

I would expect both of these options being about twice as fast.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot I will try to take out the time taken by both and will let u know , could you please tell me related memory mapping file concept a little bit that what is happening in the second program specially..as I was going through this link javarevisited.blogspot.in/2012/01/… – user1633823 Sep 1 '12 at 3:37
    
The OS takes a portion (or all the file) and maps it virtually into memory. At this point you can access the data as if it has already been read into memory or if writeable written to disk. This can reduce the overhead of copying the data significantly. Another advantage is that the loading is effectively done in the background, and you don't need to flush the data if you are happy for the OS to write the data when it can. – Peter Lawrey Sep 1 '12 at 6:55

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