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I have a question which I would like to be answered. I am in the making of a app which needs to use booleans. This is my code so far

if (but1 = true){
    //Do Something
}

But I would like to use a some type of and function in so I can say something like

if (but1 = true and but2 = true){
    //Do Something      
}

I have declared all my Boolean variables and would like to know if there is any type of function which will allow me to support this type of code which I need. Thanks

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Have you actually tried it? That would be faster than asking here. –  iMat Aug 31 '12 at 19:48
1  
read about operators and you will learn this and much more –  KDEx Aug 31 '12 at 19:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is :

if (but1 && but2){
    //Do Something      
}

Just simple Java.

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+1 - Exactly right. –  duffymo Aug 31 '12 at 19:49
    
Yes but how would I say if but1 and but2 were equaled to true or false –  Mizaan Shamaun Aug 31 '12 at 20:06
1  
Then you could use !but1 (identical to but1==false or but1!=true but more readable). Also but1 is identical to but1==true and but1!=false. It very basic logic : "but1 is true" if and only if "but1 equals to true"... –  Orabîg Aug 31 '12 at 20:10

I think that should be written this way:

if (but1) {
    //Do Something      
}

if (but1 && but2){
        //Do Something      
            }
share|improve this answer

Logical and is &. && will shortcut the evaluation if the first parameter is false. Example:

// foo() and bar() will be called
if (foo() & bar()) {
}

// bar() will not be called if foo() returns false
if (foo() && bar()) {
}
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& is Bitwise and, not logical and... –  aymeric Aug 31 '12 at 20:02
    
& can also be used on booleans. Check the JLS. –  martijno Aug 31 '12 at 20:51
    
@aymeric you are incorrect, check the Java language spec –  Steve Kuo Sep 2 '12 at 3:47
    
I do agree that the result is the same for booleans. What I was contesting is the term logical and. The JLS link @martijno posted gives me reason and I quote: 'When both operands of a &, ^, or | operator are of type boolean or Boolean, then the type of the bitwise operator expression is boolean'. You can check this link as well. –  aymeric Sep 2 '12 at 7:39

Ok, this question has been been well answered, but just to make you aware:

if (but1 = true){
    //Do Something
}

will always evaluate as true as it takes the new value assigned to but1

Also using the '==' operator is unnecessary for booleans.

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&& is also a short circuit operator. If the first evaluation fails the second is not checked. You can use one & which check both parts of the statement.

For example

if (a() && b()){...}

Will not evaluate b() if a() is false. If you had one & then b() is evaluated even if a() is false

This is the same for or (¦ and ¦¦)

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You cannot compare variables with =. A single equals sign is used for assignment, where == is used for comparison.

In Java, you can do the following:

if (a == true && b == true)
{
//do code
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

if (but1 == true && but2 == true) {
    // do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's correct, but not idiomatic. There's no need for the '== true' –  duffymo Aug 31 '12 at 19:50
    
I agree with you, just followed his code. –  Desislav Kamenov Aug 31 '12 at 19:54

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