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I'm making a game for iOS using XCode however I have run into one problem:

If I use a loop, the graphics do not get updated until the next frame after the loop has finished; so if for example I have something like this:

something.center = CGPointMake(20, something.center.y);
while(something.center.x < 50)
{
    something.center = CGPointMake(something.center.x + 1, something.center.y);
    // Just a delay:
    [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:0.01];
}

The UIImageView 'something' will just go straight from 20 to 50. I know in this occasion I should use an NSTimer but I just made this example to keep things simple.

So is there a function which I can call to update the screen, some kind of VBL?

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Nope. Do operation-heavy stuff in the background, let the UI use the main thread. –  user529758 Aug 31 '12 at 19:52
    
But it is necessary for my code to do this. Is there not simply a function to update the screen? That's all I need. –  CHRIS Aug 31 '12 at 19:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since it's best practice to use the main thread for the UI (like H2CO3 mentioned), I wouldn't recommend using sleepForTimeInterval, as it clogs up the thread doing arguably the most important job (at least for the user). Instead, you could use a timer like this:

- (void) updatePosition {

    while(something.center.x < 50) {
        something.center = CGPointMake(something.center.x + 1, something.center.y);
    }
}

NSTimer *timer = [NSTimer timerWithTimeInterval:0.05 target:self selector:@selector(updatePosition) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
[timer fire];

Of course you'll have to tweak the code and make some modifications, but that's the gist of what you should do.

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Thanks for your answer. I realize now that what I was originally intending was a bit stupid and that this method is much better. But surely because it is a while loop it would just have the same effect? I could just change my code to an if and use a timer like you suggested but how can I delete the timer once I no longer need it? –  CHRIS Aug 31 '12 at 20:34
    
@user1401690 - No problem. Also, notice in my example that the time interval is 0.05 instead of your 0.01. That's because you don't need the refresh rate to be 100 fps. –  qegal Aug 31 '12 at 20:37
    
@user1401690 - The while loop part was fine. It's just that you sleeping the thread so often that the screen couldn't update. Using an NSTimer puts less load on the main thread so it can handle updating the screen and running other concurrent tasks effectively. When you no longer need the timer, you can call [timer invalidate] –  qegal Aug 31 '12 at 20:39
    
This still tries to do all the updates synchronously, which won't work. You need to let the run loop do its thing so the drawing system gets some time to update the screen. If you want to use a timer, you need to write an update routine which does just one step of the animation and returns. Then have the timer call the update routine each time it fires, so that the view is moved just a little bit. When the view reaches its destination, kill the timer. But CA does all this for you, and does it much better. –  Caleb Aug 31 '12 at 20:53
    
This method works great. –  CHRIS Aug 31 '12 at 22:26

So is there a function which I can call to update the screen, some kind of VBL?

No. That's not how drawing works. If you change your view 50 times in a loop, the run loop never gets a chance to update the display between changes, so all he changes appear to have happened at once. You need to invalidate your view periodically and let the OS call your code to make each change.

That's not hard, but there's an even easier way: use Core Animation. CA lets you say "change the center of this view to my new value smoothly over n seconds". Once you start the animation, you can forget about it -- CA takes care of the rest:

[UIView animateWithDuration:3.0 animations:^{something.center = newCenter}];

That'll move the center of something to newCenter over 3 seconds. You can do much, much more, but you can read about that yourself.

If you want to use a timer, you need to write an update routine which does just one step of the animation and returns. Then have the timer call the update routine each time it fires, so that the view is moved just a little bit. When the view reaches its destination, kill the timer. But CA does all this for you, and does it much better.

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There's much more to Core Animation than what I illustrated, but I'll add a bit about timers from my comment below. –  Caleb Aug 31 '12 at 20:59

I think you should not use a timer in this context. When I looked for something similar, I found that a CADisplayLink is more appropriate. By using a CADisplayLink you get informed when the screens content is updated. That is, instead of invoking a method on a fixed interval you calculate the time that passed and update your content accordingly. I have used this mechanism to implement a UIScrollView subclass whose content offset can be animated using other timing functions than a linear timing. I simply set the content offset accordingly every time the display link fires. Note that the implementation might not be perfect as it has not been tested intensively. However, there are also good tutorial on using CADisplayLink.

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