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Why do I get such a big int?

int ans = 1 << 45;
printf("Check: %d", ans);
return 0;

Check: 1858443624

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2  
1858443624 isn't even a power of two .. I have no idea what happened here. –  harold Aug 31 '12 at 20:06
    
I'm just running in xcode, using C –  Austin Truong Aug 31 '12 at 20:07
2  
Why 90? That doesn't make sense either.. –  harold Aug 31 '12 at 20:07
2  
it would be 90 if you did 45 << 1 –  Geoff Reedy Aug 31 '12 at 20:08
2  
@jsn, Not even just integer overflow. Shifting it more than the width of an int is UB. –  chris Aug 31 '12 at 20:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is undefined behavior in C. Anything can happen, including stuff like processor exceptions, or unpredictable changes in other parts of the program (which can happen as a side effect of aggressive compiler optimizations).

6.5.7/3 [...] If the value of the right operand is negative or is greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand, the behavior is undefined.

Source

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2  
@ecatmur read the paragraph again, even if the promoted left operand is unsigned If the value of the right operand [...] is greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand, the behavior is undefined. –  ouah Aug 31 '12 at 20:18
    
@ouah oops, so it is, my mistake. –  ecatmur Aug 31 '12 at 20:23

According to the C standard

An expression is shifted by a negative number or by an amount greater than or equal to the width of the promoted expression (6.5.7).

is undefined behavior, so the compiler is free to do anything for the code you give here.

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90? No way. You need to read what bit-shifting does. 1<<45 is essentially 2^45. Besides, int is only 31 bits (excluding the sign bit), so by trying to shift 45 bits, you're causing undefined behavior.

Quick example:

1 << 0  =  1  = 0x01  = 00000001b
1 << 1  =  2  = 0x02  = 00000010b
1 << 2  =  4  = 0x04  = 00000100b
1 << 3  =  8  = 0x08  = 00001000b
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Thank you :), i must be confused what bit-shifting does. –  Austin Truong Aug 31 '12 at 20:09
    
@pst Typo. fixed. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 31 '12 at 20:09
    
Ahhhh, so 45 < 1, actually results to 90. –  Austin Truong Aug 31 '12 at 20:12
    
I do not think it is correct to refer to the high-bit of a two's complement integer as a sign bit. It confused me for a number of years until I learned about one's complement and IEEE-754 .. –  user166390 Aug 31 '12 at 20:12
    
@AustinTruong Yes, 45<<1 == 45*pow(2,1) == 90. –  Jonathon Reinhart Aug 31 '12 at 20:13

1) As everybody has already said, the answer is "undefined behavior".

2) In practice, just about every compiler I'm familiar with will give you "0".

3) In practice, most self-respecting compilers will also give you a warning:

x.cpp: In function `int main (int, char **)':
x.cpp:7: warning: left shift count >= width of type
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1  
"In practice, just about every compiler I'm familiar with will give you "0"." Put the 45 in a variable and you get 8192 on this Core 2 system (i.e. 1 << 13, the processors ignore the high order bits). –  AProgrammer Aug 31 '12 at 20:18

clang (as used in X-Code; AFAIK they don't use gcc anymore) is funny with this:

stieber@gatekeeper:~$ clang Test.c -Wno-shift-count-overflow; ./a.out
Check: -1344872728
stieber@gatekeeper:~$ clang Test.c -Wno-shift-count-overflow; ./a.out
Check: -1066238232
stieber@gatekeeper:~$ clang Test.c -Wno-shift-count-overflow; ./a.out
Check: -1373126936
stieber@gatekeeper:~$ clang Test.c -Wno-shift-count-overflow; ./a.out
Check: 779153128

Apparently, they randomize the result :-)

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It's probably not bothering to initialize the variable at all, so you're seeing uninitialized stack memory. –  ecatmur Aug 31 '12 at 20:27

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