Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One more question about most elegant and simple implementation of element combinations in F#.

It should return all combinations of input elements (either List or Sequence). First argument is number of elements in a combination.

For example:

comb 2 [1;2;2;3];;
[[1;2]; [1;2]; [1;3]; [2;2]; [2;3]; [2;3]]
share|improve this question
    
Vaguely related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/286427/… –  Benjol Aug 3 '09 at 12:53

5 Answers 5

let rec comb n l =
  match (n,l) with
  | (0,_) -> [[]]
  | (_,[]) -> []
  | (n,x::xs) ->
      let useX = List.map (fun l -> x::l) (comb (n-1) xs)
      let noX = comb n xs
      useX @ noX
share|improve this answer
    
Fastest solution till now, but less concise. –  The_Ghost Aug 5 '09 at 7:57
    
It looks very ugly in C#. public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Combinations<T>(IEnumerable<T> xs,int n) { if(n == 0){ return new []{Enumerable.Empty<T>()}; }else if(!xs.Any()){ return Enumerable.Empty<IEnumerable<T>>(); }else{ var head = xs.First(); var tail = xs.Skip(1); var useX = (Combinations(tail,n-1)).Select(l => (new[]{head}).Concat(l)); var noX = Combinations(tail,n); return useX.Concat(noX); } } –  Rezo Megrelidze Jul 15 at 10:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

One less concise and more faster solution than ssp:

let rec comb n l = 
    match n, l with
    | 0, _ -> [[]]
    | _, [] -> []
    | k, (x::xs) -> List.map ((@) [x]) (comb (k-1) xs) @ comb k xs
share|improve this answer
    
Could someone write simpler than that solution? –  The_Ghost Aug 5 '09 at 8:02

There is more consise version of KVB's answer:

let rec comb n l =
  match (n,l) with
    | (0,_) -> [[]]
    | (_,[]) -> []
    | (n,x::xs) ->
      List.flatten [(List.map (fun l -> x::l) (comb (n-1) xs)); (comb n xs)]
share|improve this answer

My solution is less concise, less effective (altho, no direct recursion used) but it trully returns all combinations (currently only pairs, need to extend filterOut so it can return a tuple of two lists, will do little later).

let comb lst =
    let combHelper el lst =
        lst |> List.map (fun lstEl -> el::[lstEl])
    let filterOut el lst =
        lst |> List.filter (fun lstEl -> lstEl <> el)
    lst |> List.map (fun lstEl -> combHelper lstEl (filterOut lstEl lst)) |> List.concat

comb [1;2;3;4] will return: [[1; 2]; [1; 3]; [1; 4]; [2; 1]; [2; 3]; [2; 4]; [3; 1]; [3; 2]; [3; 4]; [4; 1]; [4; 2]; [4; 3]]

share|improve this answer
    
This solution is not working correctly. It doesn't return combinations, but only pairs of elements. –  The_Ghost Aug 5 '09 at 7:45
    
It's all possible combinations. Not just tail combinations. comb [1;2;3] is 1 added to each of [2;3], 2 added to each of [1;3], 3 added to each of [1;2] –  Ray Aug 5 '09 at 10:43
    
> comb 3 [1..4];; val it : int list list = [[1; 2; 3]; [1; 2; 4]; [1; 3; 4]; [2; 3; 4]] With more elements, it should not return pairs, but triples (for n=3) –  The_Ghost Aug 5 '09 at 10:49

Ok, just tail combinations little different approach (without using of library function)

let rec comb n lst =
    let rec findChoices = function
      | h::t -> (h,t) :: [ for (x,l) in findChoices t -> (x,l) ]
      | []   -> []
    [ if n=0 then yield [] else
            for (e,r) in findChoices lst do
                for o in comb (n-1) r do yield e::o  ]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.