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I am using an API that returns a json object that I need to deserialize. My problem is that one of the members of those object is sometimes an empty array ("[]") and sometimes a dictionary ("{"1":{...}, "2":{...}}"). I want to deserialize it into either an array or a dictionary, since I don't car about the IDs, I just want a list of all the objects. Here is how I deserialize the object:

var response = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Response>(json);

And here is the definition of the Response class:

public class Response
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "variations")]
    public Dictionary<int, Variation> Variations { get; set; }
}

It works well when the Response contains a dictionary in it's variations field, but it fails when it contains an empty array. I'm getting an error from Newtonsoft saying that an array cannot be deserialized into a dictionary. If I define the Variations property as an array, it works for empty arrays, but it fails when it is a dictionary. What could I do to either deserialize correctly both possible values, or to ignore empty arrays and set Variations to null when it's an array instead of failing.

Thanks.

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1  
Well, what a bum source :( I bet it is coming from PHP, huh? –  user166390 Aug 31 '12 at 20:32
    
I have seen suggestions to "text replace before converting", but I think it could also be done via a custom JsonConverter. –  user166390 Aug 31 '12 at 20:38
    
@pst : That's a great idea, did't think of doing that. –  Carl Aug 31 '12 at 20:40
    
If referring to the text replace, I don't think I'd call it "great", but perhaps "hack-ish and working in a pinch". It is easy to imagine degenerate data .. if in .NET4 I believe it would be possible to use dynamic with a wrapper accessor (but I do not use .NET4 or dynamic). –  user166390 Aug 31 '12 at 20:41
    
@pst : It's true that it's a hack, but I don't see when changing [] for {} might alter the data. As for the dynamic keyword, it does deserialize, but I'm not very familiar with how I can use the object afterwards. –  Carl Aug 31 '12 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

Here is a variation (sorry for the pun) on Carl's example. I had a similar need, but instead of returning a dictionary, I needed an array. The API I am using says it returns an array. However, in the case where there is only one item in the result, it is returned as an object instead!

public class VarationsContainer
{
    [JsonIgnore]
    public Varation[] Varations
    {
        get
        {
            return ParseObjectToArray<Variation>(VariationObject);
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "varations")]
    public object VarationsObject { get; set; }

    protected T[] ParseObjectToArray<T>(object ambiguousObject)
    {
        var json = ambiguousObject.ToString();
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(json))
        {
            return new T[0]; // Could return null here instead.
        }
        else if (json.TrimStart().StartsWith("["))
        {
            return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T[]>(json);
        }
        else
        {
            return new T[1] { JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(json) };
        }
    }
}

I hope this is useful to some other sad API consumer.

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+1 Saved me a lot of mucking around thanks. Works perfectly for object / array (in my case ToList()). –  Robin Rieger Jun 17 at 5:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the solution I used :

    public Dictionary<int, Variation> Variations
    {
        get
        {
            var json = this.VariationsJson.ToString();
            if (json.RemoveWhiteSpace() == EmptyJsonArray)
            {
                return new Dictionary<int, Variation>();
            }
            else
            {
                return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<int, Variation>>(json);
            }
        }
    }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "variations")]
    public object VariationsJson { get; set; }

Basically, the variations are first deserialized in a basic object. When I want to read the value, I check if the object is an empty array, and if so I return an empty dictionary. If the object is a good dictionary, I deserialize it and return it.

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