Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does ~0 mean its flipping 000000000 to 1111111111?

printf("Check: %i", ~0);

The printf results to -1, which is why I am confused.
Does -1 essentially mean the same thing as 11111111111111111 bits?

share|improve this question
2  
first hit on google eskimo.com/~scs/cclass/int/sx4ab.html –  maazza Aug 31 '12 at 20:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Does ~0 mean its flipping 000000000 to 1111111111?

Yes, it does.

Does -1 essentially mean the same thing as 11111111111111111 bits?

In 2s complement representation, it does.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay thanks thanks, i appreciate it. –  AustinT Aug 31 '12 at 20:30
2  
I'm used to someone beating me to the answer (slow typing here), but typically they don't grab nine upvotes too! A tip of the hat to you. –  Edwin Buck Aug 31 '12 at 20:35
    
@AustinTruong ~0 does not evaluate in 1111111111 unless int is internally only 10 bits. Same issue with second part. –  oldrinb Aug 31 '12 at 23:35
Does ~0 mean its flipping 000000000 to 1111111111?

Yes, that's what it means.

printf("Check: %i", ~0);

The printf results to -1, which is why I am confused.

That's because of 2's complement arithmetic, where we have conventionally accepted zero to be

000000000000

and subtracting one from it requires a "borrow" that requires a borrow, and so on, until you "roll" the entire register

111111111111

Logically, if you add "1" to that number, it will carry, and carry, and so on until it "rolls" in the opposite direction, yielding 000000000 again.

Does -1 essentially mean the same thing as 11111111111111111 bits?

Yes, as long as you are using 2's complement signed integers.

---- Edited, to include details from cincutar's now deleted post (I wish he didn't delete it) ---

To see the same memory formatted as a (unsigned) hexadecimal number, use the command

printf("Check: %x", ~0);

which will print the output

Check ffffffff

which is (for those who don't read hexadecimal well)

11111111111111111111111111111111
share|improve this answer

It is due to the mathematical operation "two's complement". A nice video tutorial of two's complement can be found on youtube. Here's one of them :)

youtube link

share|improve this answer

~0 == 0xFFFFFFFF

where 0xFFFFFFFF= 32 times 1 , which is -1 in 2's compliement representation

since ~ is a bitwise operation and turns zero to one in each bit:

~0b1010 == 0b0101
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.