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Here is a short snippet of a function reading lines. How is that possible that it compares bufsize with ((size_t)-1)/2 ?

I imagined comparing a variable to eg. int - that is just impossible; to INT_MAX on the contrary it is correct, I think. So how can that code actually work and give no errors?

int c;
size_t bufsize = 0;
size_t size = 0;

while((c=fgetc(infile)) != EOF) {
    if (size >= bufsize) {
        if (bufsize == 0)
                bufsize = 2;
        else if (bufsize <= ((size_t)-1)/2)
                bufsize = 2*size;
        else {
                free(line);
                exit(3);
        }
        newbuf = realloc(line,bufsize);
        if (!newbuf) {
                free(line);
                abort();
        }
        line = newbuf;
    }
    /* some other operations */
}
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code relies on some assumptions about bits and then does a well known hack for finding the maximum size_t value (provided that size_t doesn't accommodate more bits than the register, a safe bet on many machines).

First it fills a register up with 1 bits, then it casts it into a size_t data type, so the comparison will work. As long as that register is larger in number of bits than the size_t data type, then the (if any) unused 1 bits will be truncated, and you will get the largest unsigned number that can fit in size_t bits.

After you have that, it divides by two to get half of that number, and does the comparison to see if it seems to be safe to increase size without going over the "maximum" size_t. but by then, it's dividing a size_t data type, and comparing two size_t data types (a type safe operation).

If you really wanted to remove this bit-wizardy (ok, it's not the worst example of bit wizardy I've seen). Consider that the following snippet

    else if (bufsize <= ((size_t)-1)/2)
            bufsize = 2*size;

could be replaced with

    else if (bufsize <= (MAX_SIZE/2)
            bufsize = 2*size;

and be type safe without casting and more readable.

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3  
The macro exists and its name is SIZE_MAX – ouah Aug 31 '12 at 20:57
    
Awesome. At one point in time the (size_t)-1 hack seemed to be the only game in town. Perhaps it's just knowing to much about the bits under the covers that kept me from finding it. I'll update the answer – Edwin Buck Aug 31 '12 at 21:01
2  
(size_t) -1 is still used explicitly in the Standard when they want to reserve a size_t value to indicate an error. For example (C99, 7.24.6.3.1p3) The mbrlen function returns a value between zero and n, inclusive, (size_t)(-2), or (size_t)(-1). – ouah Aug 31 '12 at 21:13
2  
This is a much misleading answer. There is nothing to know about the "bits" and this is not a "hack". Unsigned arithmetic in C is defined through values and -1 converted to an unsigned type will always be the maximal value of that type minus one. – Jens Gustedt Aug 31 '12 at 21:42
1  
@JensGustedt I think people are confusing two different things. ouah never said that the largest size had to be (size_t)(-2). He said it had to either be (size_t)(-2) or (size_t)(-1). With such a definition, you really want to use SIZE_MAX, just in case you're on the odd platform where it happens to be (size_t)(-2). My platform SIZE_MAX = 18446744073709551615UL = (size_t)-1. Someone else's might be the same, or might be (size_t)-2, that possibility alone is a very good reason to use SIZE_MAX. – Edwin Buck Aug 31 '12 at 21:56
(size_t)-1

This is casting the value -1 to a size_t. (type)value is a cast in C.

Since size_t is an unsigned type, this is actually the maximum value that size_t can hold, so it's used to make sure that the buffer size can actually be safely doubled (hence the subsequent division by two).

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1  
You could add that -1 is all Bits set to one because of Two-Complement representation and therefore the maximum value. – halex Aug 31 '12 at 21:00
3  
@halex, this has nothing to do with the representation of the number. int (and thus -1) could well be represented in one of the two other possible representations that would still lead to the same result. Conversion from signed to unsigned types just uses the value and not the representation. – Jens Gustedt Aug 31 '12 at 21:37
1  
@JensGustedt The goal of (size_t)-1 is to get the maximum value of the type size_t, and that is all bits set to one. If I understand it correctly then if -1 would be represented in an other representation than 2-Complement it were not all 1s. – halex Aug 31 '12 at 21:56
2  
@halex: You're wrong; it has nothing to do with the representation because casts do not operate on representations; they operate on values. (size_t)-1 reduces the integer -1 modulo SIZE_MAX+1 to a value in the range 0 to SIZE_MAX. (size_t)-1 is just a way of writing SIZE_MAX without depending on the macro (which did not exist prior to C99). – R.. Sep 1 '12 at 1:04
1  
@R.. Ah ok thank you. I always thought that the same bitpattern is interpreted as the new value, but it's value based. I searched in the standard too and found in 6.3.1.3 Signed and unsigned integers: Otherwise, if the new type is unsigned, the value is converted by repeatedly adding or subtracting one more than the maximum value that can be represented in the new type until the value is in the range of the new type. That explains everything :). – halex Sep 1 '12 at 6:10

(size_t)-1 casts -1 to the type size_t, which results in SIZE_MAX (a macro defined in stdint.h), the maximum value that the size_t type can hold.

So the comparison is checking whether bufsize is less than or equal to one half the maximum value that can be contained in a size_t

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size_t isn't being interpreted as a value, it's being used to cast the value of negative one to the type size_t.

((size_t)-1)/2

is casting -1 to a size_t and then dividing by 2.

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The size_t in ((size_t)-1)/2) is simply being used as a cast: casting -1 to size_t.

The trick here is that size_t is unsigned, so the cast (size_t) -1 will be converted to the maximum value of size_t, or SIZE_MAX. This is useful in the context of the loop. However, I'd prefer to see SIZE_MAX used directly rather than this trick.

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1  
SIZE_MAX was not defined prior to C99, so code aiming for maximum portability will use (size_t)-1 to get the max value of size_t. – R.. Sep 1 '12 at 1:05

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