Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For a given process, how can I learn its

  • cpu usage (%)
  • memory usage (allocated memory)
  • network usage (bytes in/sec, bytes out/sec)

I'm interested in collecting this information from a c# app.

share|improve this question
    
Can you not use perfmon? –  Davin Tryon Aug 31 '12 at 21:28
3  
Sorry, just trying to help. All the data is in the WMI database. It is just how you access it. For me, perfmon is the best tool and usually installed where you need it (like production environments). So, if you want a better answer, I suggest you give more detail about what you are trying to do. –  Davin Tryon Aug 31 '12 at 21:43
    
I can't use perfmon, because I need to collect this information programatically. –  user1367401 Aug 31 '12 at 22:01
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This article and this example + some c# coding skills are all you need.

Oh, and concerning the process network monitoring, Microsof has a Network Monitor API but YAPM is a superman.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is possible to track all that information with the PerformanceCounter Class.

You can find a more detailed list here as to what kind of information you can track.

share|improve this answer
    
IO includes disk and network io. –  user1367401 Aug 31 '12 at 22:15
add comment

There are classes built into C# that can do this. A Simple Google search "calculate memory usage C#" of "calculate cpu usage C#" brought them up

http://bhaskarrajukonduru-dotnet.blogspot.ca/2010/06/calculate-memory-and-cpu-usage-by-using.html http://stackoverflow.com/questions/278071/how-to-get-the-cpu-usage-in-c (note, you could of searched stackoverflow too) http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/10258/How-to-get-CPU-usage-of-processes-and-threads

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.