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Is it possible to stop hibernate from auto updating a persistent object?

    @Transactional
    public ResultTO updateRecord(RequestTO requestTO) {

        Entity entity = dao.getEntityById(requestTO.getId());

         // now update the entity based on the data in the requestTO

         ValidationResult validationResult = runValidation(entity);

         if(validationResult.hasErrors()) {
            // return ResultTO with validation errors
         } else {
             dao.persist(entity);
        }
    }

Here is what happens in the code, I retrieve the entity which would be considered by hibernate to be in persistent state, then I update some of the fields in the entity, then pass the entity to validation. if validation fails, then don't udpate, if validation succeeds then persist the entity.

Here is the main issue with this flow: because I updated the entity for it to be used in the validation, it does not matter whether I call persist() method (on the DAO) or not, the record will always be updated because hibernate detects that the entity has been changed and flags it for update.

Keep im mind I can change the way i do validation and work around the issue, so I'm not interested in workarounds. I'm interested in knowing how i would be able to disable the hibernate feature where it automatically updates persistent objects.

Please keep in mind I'm using hibernates' implementation of JPA. so Hibernate specific answers dealing with hibernate specific API will not work for me.

I tried to look for hibernate configuration and see if I can set any configuration to stop this behavior but no luck.

Thanks

--EDIT --- I couldn't find a solution to this, so I opted to rolling back the transaction without throwing any RuntimeException even though I'm in a declarative transaction using:

TransactionInterceptor.currentTransactionStatus().setRollbackOnly();

which works like a charm.

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4 Answers 4

Configure FlushMode for your session.

http://docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/3.5/api/org/hibernate/FlushMode.html

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This is Hibernate specific API that mainly pertains to how hibernates acts before executing queries (flush or not, to avoid stale data). JPA EntityManager allows setting the flush mode but it also only pertains to query management. even though i still tried to set the flush mode in the EntityManager to different types and it still didn't make a difference. –  lutfijd Sep 3 '12 at 18:55
    
@user Your comment is not clear to me. In the link I pasted above is clearly set "Represents a flushing strategy. The flush process synchronizes database state with session state by detecting state changes and executing SQL statements." See link –  Łukasz Rzeszotarski Sep 3 '12 at 21:15
    
first: this is Hibernate specific API and not JPA API. second: JPA flush mode settings dont affect the behavior since since JPA has 2 flush mode types commit and auto and doesnt have manual mode. so back to my question how to disable auto updates in JPA because the links you provided wont help much in JPA context. –  lutfijd Sep 3 '12 at 22:09
    
Ok, now it clear. Thanks. –  Łukasz Rzeszotarski Sep 4 '12 at 7:40

Throw an exception if validation fails and have the caller handle that.

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thanks, but as i said im not looking for a workaround, i already have that, im looking for a specific configuration to that can diable auto updating. –  lutfijd Sep 1 '12 at 0:26

You can use EntityManager.clear() method after getting object from database. http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/api/javax/persistence/EntityManager.html#clear()

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You can call the following code:

TransactionAspectSupport.currentTransactionStatus().setRollbackOnly();
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