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I am trying to solve equivalent binary trees exercise on go tour. Here is what I did;

package main

import "tour/tree"
import "fmt"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func WalkRecurse(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    if t.Left != nil {
        Walk(t.Left, ch)
    }
    ch <- t.Value
    if t.Right != nil {
        Walk(t.Right,ch)
    }

}

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    WalkRecurse(t, ch)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1 := make(chan int)
    ch2 := make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for k := range ch1{
        select {
        case g := <-ch2:
            if k != g {
                return false
            }
        default:
            break
        }
    }
    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println(Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))
}

However, I couldn't find out how to signal if any no more elements left in trees. I can't use close(ch) on Walk() because it makes the channel close before all values are sent (because of recursion.) Can anyone lend me a hand here?

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I've read that like six times and still don't understand. Why do you need to signal that there are no more elements left in the tree? –  FrankieTheKneeMan Sep 1 '12 at 0:57
1  
@FrankieTheKneeMan To break out the infinite for loop. Currently, for loop only finishes if any of the elements are different. –  yasar Sep 1 '12 at 0:59
    
Right, because it hangs on a channel. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Sep 1 '12 at 1:01
    
@FrankieTheKneeMan Yes, how do I make so that it won't hang on channel? –  yasar Sep 1 '12 at 1:03
    
@yasar11732 You just need to remove the default case, have a look at my proposed solution here (Also, I use a Walk function similar to the one presented here) –  tokou Jul 27 '13 at 9:45
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use close() if your Walk function doesn't recurse on itself. i.e. Walk would just do:

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
   walkRecurse(t, ch)
   close(ch)
}

Where walkRecurseis more or less your current Walk function, but recursing on walkRecurse. (or you rewrite Walk to be iterative - which, granted, is more hazzle) With this approach, your Same() function have to learn that the channels was closed, which is done with the channel receive of the form

k,ok1 := <-ch
g,ok2 := <-ch

And take proper action when ok1 and ok2 are different, or when they're both false

Another way, but probably not in the spirit of the exercise, is to count the number of nodes in the tree:

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    countT1 := countTreeNodes(t1)
    countT2 := countTreeNodes(t2)
    if countT1!= countT2 {
       return false
    }
    ch1:=make(chan int)
    ch2:=make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for i:=0; i<countT1; i++ {
        if <-ch1 != <-ch2 {
            return false
        }
    }

    return true
}  

You'l have to implement the countTreeNodes()function, which should count the number of nodes in a *Tree

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1  
I have updated code in my question. I am getting panic: runtime error: send on closed channel –  yasar Sep 1 '12 at 1:18
2  
@yasar11732 Your WalkRecurse body have to call WalkRecurse, not Walk –  nos Sep 1 '12 at 1:19
1  
I don't think that counting the number of nodes is the best solution. You'd need to have two passes on each tree. You can see my proposed one-pass-solution here –  tokou Jul 27 '13 at 9:43
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An elegant solution using closure was presented in the golang-nuts group,

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
  defer close(ch)  // <- closes the channel when this function returns
  var walk func(t *tree.Tree)
  walk = func(t *tree.Tree) {
    if t == nil { return }
    walk(t.Left)
    ch <- t.Value
    walk(t.Right)
  }
  walk(t)
}
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This is my solution. It properly checks for differences in the length of the two sequences.

package main

import "code.google.com/p/go-tour/tree"
import "fmt"

func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walker func (t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func (t *tree.Tree) {
        if t.Left != nil {
            walker(t.Left)
        }
        ch <- t.Value
        if t.Right != nil {
            walker(t.Right)
        }
    }
    walker(t)
    close(ch)
}

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    chana := make (chan int)
    chanb := make (chan int)

    go Walk(t1, chana)
    go Walk(t2, chanb)

    for {
        n1, ok1 := <-chana
        n2, ok2 := <-chanb        
        if n1 != n2 || ok1 != ok2 {
            return false
        }
        if (!ok1) {
            break
        }
    }
    return true; 
}
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You got it almost right, there's no need to use the select statement because you will go through the default case too often, here's my solution that works without needing to count the number of nodes in the tress:

func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)
    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)
    for i := range ch1 {
        j, more := <-ch2
        if more {
            if i != j { return false }
        } else { return false }
    }

    return true
}
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2  
Your solution isn't correct. If ch2 has more elements than ch1, then it will return true. You should check at the end if ch2 has more elements –  Marco Jan 18 at 21:50
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Here's the full solution using ideas here and from the Google Group thread

package main

import "fmt"
import "code.google.com/p/go-tour/tree"

// Walk walks the tree t sending all values
// from the tree to the channel ch.
func Walk(t *tree.Tree, ch chan int) {
    var walker func(t *tree.Tree)
    walker = func (t *tree.Tree) {
        if (t == nil) {
            return
        }
        walker(t.Left)
        ch <- t.Value
        walker(t.Right)
    }
    walker(t)
    close(ch)
}

// Same determines whether the trees
// t1 and t2 contain the same values.
func Same(t1, t2 *tree.Tree) bool {
    ch1, ch2 := make(chan int), make(chan int)

    go Walk(t1, ch1)
    go Walk(t2, ch2)

    for {
        v1,ok1 := <- ch1
        v2,ok2 := <- ch2

        if v1 != v2 || ok1 != ok2 {
            return false
        }

        if !ok1 {
            break
        }
    }

    return true
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("1 and 1 same: ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(1)))
    fmt.Println("1 and 2 same: ", Same(tree.New(1), tree.New(2)))

}
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