Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is stupid, but i have to know how ( % ) sign means, because i want to add days.

this is an example.

int seconds = 78120;
int forHours = (seconds1 / 3600),
    remainder = (seconds1 % 3600),
    forMinutes = remainder / 60,
    forSeconds = remainder % 60;
    NSString *Time = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02i:%02i:%02i",forHours,forMinutes,forSeconds];
    Label.text = Time;

Result: 21:42:00

i want the result to be like ( 0 days, 21:42:00 ) like ( DD, HH:mm:ss )

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by H2CO3, casperOne Sep 20 '12 at 13:55

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Where did you get this code? If you don't know what % does, how do you know you want to use it? Your actual question, "i have to know how ( % ) sign means, because i want to add days", perplexes me. – WendiKidd Sep 1 '12 at 2:25
1  
Where i get this code? from this site.. – Stackie Sep 1 '12 at 6:12
    
( % ) sign is the only one that i did not know what it meant.. – Stackie Sep 1 '12 at 6:22
    
Please don't vandalize your posts. – PeeHaa Apr 1 '13 at 20:56
    
i just want this to get deleted sorry for that. – Stackie Apr 3 '13 at 19:14

It's called the modulo operation. It's whats left when you divide a number (and only take into account whole numbers).

Examples:

3 % 2 = 1
6 % 2 = 0
6 % 3 = 0
6 % 4 = 2
share|improve this answer
    
aaah now i get it, THANKS !! – Stackie Sep 1 '12 at 1:59

% (modulo) gives the remainder after division.

So you can add the separation for days at the start, then use modulo to get the number of seconds after removing those accounted for in days:

int seconds = 78120;
int days = seconds / 86400;

// Equivalent to: seconds = seconds - days * 86400 /*# seconds in a day*/;
seconds = seconds % 86400; // seconds remaining less than a day

int forHours = (seconds1 / 3600),
    remainder = (seconds1 % 3600), // seconds remaining within an hour
    forMinutes = remainder / 60,
    forSeconds = remainder % 60; // seconds remaining less than a minute
share|improve this answer

The modulus (%) operator returns the remainder of the integer division.

a = 13 % 5;

Here, a will equal 3.

Try:

int fordays = seconds1 / 86400,
    remainder = seconds1 % 86400,
    forHours = remainder / 3600,
    remainder = remainder % 3600,
    forMinutes = remainder / 60,
    forSeconds = remainder % 60; 

1 day = 86400 seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your responds!! that's what i need! – Stackie Sep 1 '12 at 1:58
    
Glad to help! :) – doug65536 Sep 1 '12 at 2:02

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.