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I honestly can't think of a better title, I'm new with writing my own javascript.

Basically, I have the following script which will translate a hex value to an rgb value:

$(".submit").click(function() {
    function hex2rgb(hex) {
        if (hex.length < 3) {
            $(".result").text("Error");
        }
        if (hex[0] == "#") {
            hex = hex.substr(1);
        }
        if (hex.length == 3) {
            var temp = hex;
            hex = '';
            temp = /^([a-f0-9])([a-f0-9])([a-f0-9])$/i.exec(temp).slice(1);
            for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) hex += temp[i] + temp[i];
        }
        var triplets = /^([a-f0-9]{2})([a-f0-9]{2})([a-f0-9]{2})$/i.exec(hex).slice(1);
        return {
            red: parseInt(triplets[0], 16),
            green: parseInt(triplets[1], 16),
            blue: parseInt(triplets[2], 16)
        }
    }
    var hex = $(".hex").val();
    var rgb = hex2rgb("#" + hex);
    $(".result").text("rgba(" + rgb.red + "," + rgb.green + "," + rgb.blue + ",1)");
});​

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/charlescarver/JkeKV/5/

When the number of digits entered in the textbox is less than 3 (an incomplete hex code), it changes the text of .result to error. The code itself works fine, but the console is throwing up an error saying...

TypeError: 'null' is not an object (evaluating '/^([a-f0-9]{2})([a-f0-9]{2})([a-f0-9]{2})$/i.exec(hex).slice')

I assumed that if the code was less than 3 digits, it would just display the error, not try to move on to if (hex.length == 3) {} function, which it seems like it is doing. Is any of this correct?

Also, would it be better to use if (hex.length == 3) {} or if (hex.length >= 3) { for the function that translates the hex to rgb? I'm only thinking this because the number of digits has to be 3 >= x <= 6?

share|improve this question
    
why you checking for length == 3? just error if Hex length < 6 –  yngum Sep 1 '12 at 2:23
    
Because the hex length could be 3, #333 would be the same as #333333. –  Charlie Sep 1 '12 at 3:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will move to the next if statement because you are not returning from the function when there's an error:

if (hex.length < 3) {
  $(".result").text("Error");
  return;
}

An alternative is to use an else for the rest of your code that does pass that validation:

if (hex.length < 3) {
  $(".result").text("Error");
} else {
  if (hex[0] == "#") {
    // ...
}

With respect to your other question, I'd use if (hex.length >= 3 && hex.length <= 6) {} since as you said, you want to validate that 3 >= x <= 6.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like it's moving on again from there, as I'm getting this error: TypeError: 'undefined' is not an object (evaluating 'rgb.red'). Updated fiddle: jsfiddle.net/charlescarver/JkeKV/6 –  Charlie Sep 1 '12 at 2:00
    
@Charlie: What input are you using? Do you accept #ffffff, or just #fff? Your regular expression only considers the former. –  João Silva Sep 1 '12 at 2:02
    
I thought I was accepting both, I'm trying to figure out why I did that. Oh, I think I figured it out... It should be if (hex.length == 3) {} so that if it's 3 or more, it gets passed into the function, but if it's 6, it gets passed into the triplets function? –  Charlie Sep 1 '12 at 2:05
    
@Charlie: Since you now do not return an object with the red property. You need to take that into account after invoking the hex2rgb function. Also, why do you always concatenate the # character if you remove it in the function? –  João Silva Sep 1 '12 at 2:08
    
@Charlie: Here's a working example jsfiddle.net/JkeKV/7. I think it's what you want. Please let me know if you need some help understanding anything. –  João Silva Sep 1 '12 at 2:14

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