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This is a program for calculating factorial of a number and I store it in a vector. The Program works fine for inputs upto 30, but for n=40 and greater, it produces a weird output. eg.

input:

3

4

30

40

Output:

24

265252859812191058636308480000000

-190350521-236-6-6-5-745611269596115894272000000000

Where does this - sign come from?

#include<vector>
#include<cstdio>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;
vector<int> solve(int n){
        if(n==1){
                vector<int> ans;
                ans.push_back(1);
                return ans; 
        }
        vector<int> b=solve(n-1);
        int temp=0,x=0;
        for(int i=0;i<b.size();i++){
                x=b[i]*n+temp;
                b[i]=x%10;
                temp=x/10;
        }
        if(temp!=0)
            b.push_back(temp);
        return b;
}   
    int main(){
            int t,n,i;
            scanf("%d",&t);
            while(t--){
                    scanf("%d",&n);
                    vector<int> ans=solve(n);
                    for(int j=ans.size()-1;j>=0;j--)
                             printf("%d",ans[j]);
                    printf("\n");
            }
    }           
share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Ajay, BЈовић, nijansen, lpapp, Kerrek SB Mar 4 at 22:57

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Because you are using signed integers? –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 1 '12 at 5:41
    
but I am computing the entire vector<int> int the code, so where does it go negative? –  Jignesh Sep 1 '12 at 5:42
1  
If you don't believe my, use a debugger to step through the code, and you will see that some of the values you push into the vector will be negative. See the answer from David Schwartz about the reason for that. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 1 '12 at 5:44
    
There's no guarantee that temp will be less than 10 when you push_back it into the vector at the end of solve(). When it exceeds 10, you get increasingly incorrect results. Follow the advice you've already been given: don't use signed integers to represent unsigned digits, use a larger capacity data type for temporary results, pay attention to compiler warnings. –  DCoder Sep 1 '12 at 6:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's integer overflow. A fixed-size integer can only hold so large a value and then it overflows. You probably want to use an arbitrary precision integer library like GMP.

Run your code with these changes and it will become obvious:

vector<int> solve(int n)
{
    if(n==1){
            vector<int> ans; 
            ans.push_back(1);
            return ans;
    }
    vector<int> b=solve(n-1);
    int temp=0,x=0;
    cout << "b.size=" << b.size() << ", n=" << n << endl;
    for(int i=0;i<b.size();i++){
            x=b[i]*n+temp;
            cout << "b[ " << i << "]=" << b[i] << ", temp= " << temp << ", x=" << x << endl;
            b[i]=x%10;
            temp=x/10;
    }
    if(temp!=0)
    {
        cout << "push_back(" << temp << ")" << endl;
        b.push_back(temp);
    }
    return b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not entirely accurate. It was my first thought too, but notice that he actually attempts to create his own bignum based on std::vector<int> –  Puppy Sep 1 '12 at 5:46
    
Nevertheless, it overflows. Figuring out where he goes wrong would require understanding how this was supposed to work. But if he just wants to figure out where it goes negative, the easiest way would be to add in sufficient logging to see where the values explode. –  David Schwartz Sep 1 '12 at 6:01

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