Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file contain lines with path to the files. Sometimes a path contain SHELL environment variable and I want to check the file existence. The following is my solution:

set fh [open "the_file_contain_path" "r"]

while {![eof $fh]} { 
  set line [gets $fh]
  if {[regexp -- {\$\S+} $line]} {
    catch {exec /usr/local/bin/tcsh -c "echo  $line" } line
      if {![file exists $line]} {
        puts "ERROR: the file $line is not exists"
      }
  }
}

I sure there is more elegant solution without using

/usr/local/bin/tcsh -c

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can capture the variable name in the regexp command and do a lookup in Tcl's global env array. Also, your use of eof as the while condition means your loop will interate one time too many (see http://phaseit.net/claird/comp.lang.tcl/fmm.html#eof)

set fh [open "the_file_contain_path" "r"]

while {[gets $fh line] != -1} { 
  # this can handle "$FOO/bar/$BAZ"
  if {[string first {$} $line] != -1} {
    regsub -all {(\$)(\w+)} $line {\1::env(\2)} new
    set line [subst -nocommand -nobackslashes $new]
  }

  if {![file exists $line]} {
    puts "ERROR: the file $line does not exist"
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not quite the same thing; it doesn't handle $FOO/bar well. –  Donal Fellows Sep 2 '12 at 9:57
    
@DonalFellows, quite right. updated. –  glenn jackman Sep 2 '12 at 12:41
    
@rkaganov, please check out my updated answer. –  glenn jackman Sep 2 '12 at 12:43
    
Hello Glenn, your updated solution works right. Thanks a lot. –  Roman Kaganovich Sep 3 '12 at 7:19

First off, it's usually easier (for small files, say of no more than 1–2MB) to read in the whole file and split it into lines instead of using gets and eof in a while loop. (The split command is very fast.)

Secondly, to do the replacement you need the place in the string to replace, so you use regexp -indices. That does mean that you need to take a little more complex approach to doing the replacement, with string range and string replace to do some of the work. Assuming you're using Tcl 8.5…

set fh [open "the_file_contain_path" "r"]

foreach line [split [read $fh] "\n"] {
    # Find a replacement while there are any to do
    while {[regexp -indices {\$(\w+)} $line matchRange nameRange]} {

        # Get what to replace with (without any errors, just like tcsh)
        set replacement {}
        catch {set replacement $::env([string range $line {*}$nameRange])}

        # Do the replacement
        set line [string replace $line {*}$matchRange $replacement]
    }

    # Your test on the result
    if {![file exists $line]} {
        puts "ERROR: the file $line is not exists"
    }
}
share|improve this answer

TCL programs can read environment variables using the built-in global variable env. Read the line, look for $ followed by a name, look up $::env($name), and substitute it for the variable.

Using the shell for this is very bad if the file is supplied by untrusted users. What if they put ; rm * in the file? And if you're going to use a shell, you should at least use sh or bash, not tcsh.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.